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Case Studies Underrated – or the Value of Project Cases

  • Ruurd N. Pikaar
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 822)

Abstract

In case studies a project is defined as the systematic design and implementation of a work system in the context of an investment project. It includes a system ergonomics design approach, an actual Human Factors (HF) intervention, feedback on project results as well as on methodology. HF activities are a small part of a project: other disciplines are involved and usually leading. HF Professionals interpret and integrate the results of scientific research. Feedback from practice could benefit researchers as well as practitioners. However, project results are not often published because it is not a part of the project scope, confidentiality, or simply a lack time and encouragement. It is not particularly helpful that the scientific community shows little interest in material presumably based on small sample sizes. To tackle this problem, IEA World Congresses and ODAM conferences since 2006 promoted company case study sessions.

A project case study is not only about looking back. New application areas and emerging technologies could benefit from HF knowledge. HF Professionals possess long time experiences, for instance regarding automation in process industries. They know the risks of high levels of automation and how to cope with them. This could be applied in autonomous shipping, traffic control, or remote operations. Transfer of proven HF knowledge requires published case studies. This paper presents an introduction in project case studies, gives a literature overview, and proposes a framework for the systematic reporting of cases. Some automation trends will be addressed, whilst showing possible benefits of knowledge transfer, or the need for this.

Keywords

Human factors engineering Production ergonomics Marketing ergonomics Automation Technology push Project case study 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The author thanks his colleagues at ErgoS Human Factors Engineering for their contributions and giving an opportunity to work on this paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ErgoS Human Factors EngineeringEnschedeNetherlands

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