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Adventure and Sustainability

  • Simon Beames
  • Chris Mackie
  • Matthew Atencio
Chapter

Abstract

After reading this chapter, you will be able to:
  • Describe the environmental costs that come from adventure equipment manufacture and air travel

  • Outline the key labour rights issues associated with the manufacture of outdoor clothing and equipment

  • Critically consider the ethical imperatives for adventures that come with a deeper understanding of the ecological and human rights costs inherent in them

  • Understand how the notion of seeking ‘authentic’ and ‘sustainable’ adventures within broader contexts of capitalism, technology, and social media is highly problematic

Key Readings

  1. Humphreys, A. (2014). Microadventures: Local discoveries for great escapes. London: William Collins.Google Scholar
  2. Rawles, K. (2013). Adventure in a carbon-light era. In E. Pike & S. Beames (Eds.), Outdoor adventure and social theory (pp. 147–159). Abingdon, UK: Routledge.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon Beames
    • 1
  • Chris Mackie
    • 2
  • Matthew Atencio
    • 3
  1. 1.University of EdinburghEdinburghUK
  2. 2.University of the Highlands and IslandsInvernessUK
  3. 3.California State University East BayHaywardUSA

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