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Exploration: Becoming Playful—The Power of a Ludic Module

  • Sandra SinfieldEmail author
  • Tom Burns
  • Sandra Abegglen
Chapter

Abstract

We developed a ludic module where play is the process that smooths out the reductive, transactional striations of formal education. Becoming is a module where play is the reflection and recognition of the self. We asked our students to knit, dance and sing—celebrating their practice and empowering their voice—allowing them to find and develop their academic identity and ‘be with’ each other. The chapter shows what happened when we allowed our students to take responsibility for their learning—in a joyful and playful way—and gave them the options about what they wanted to learn—and how.

Keywords

Ludic Academic skills Process Thirdspace Empowerment Development 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.London Metropolitan UniversityLondonUK

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