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Latinx Immigrants Set the Stage for 2050

  • Patricia Arredondo
Chapter
Part of the International and Cultural Psychology book series (ICUP)

Abstract

Persons of Latinx heritage have arrived to or been in what is considered the United States for centuries. Chilenos arrived during the “Gold Rush” and many immigrants from Chile settled in California over the years. For the twenty-first century, several projections are made. One report suggests that the United States could have more speakers of Spanish than any other country. This does not mean monolingual Spanish but individuals who are bilingual or continue to speak Spanish at home. From the Pew Hispanic Research Center (Lopez and Minushkin, Hispanics see their situation in US deteriorating; oppose key immigration enforcement measures, 2008) are population projections. This report indicates that non-Hispanic Whites will constitute 47% of the population in 2050; today they are 67% of the population. Primarily based on childbirth versus immigration, the Latinx heritage population that was at 14% in 2005, and in 2017 is at 17% will rise to 29% in 2050. Non-Hispanic Whites. It cannot be disputed; Latinx immigrants and their families are setting the stage for 2050.

Keywords

Latinx Psychohistorical Xenophobia DACA familismo Latinx identity mestizaje Immigrant and borderlands 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Arredondo
    • 1
  1. 1.Arredondo Advisory GroupPhoenixUSA

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