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Neither with you nor without you: Performance and Philosophy in Beckett’s Non-relational Aesthetics

  • Daniel Koczy
Chapter
Part of the Performance Philosophy book series (PPH)

Abstract

This chapter provides an account of Beckett’s non-relational aesthetics and asks what relevance it has for research undertaken at the borders of performance and philosophy. It argues that Beckett was motivated by a desire to create theatrical encounters with a chaos which is so radically opposed to meaning that it could only be expressed as nothing. Focusing on Beckett’s Murphy and the early reception of Waiting for Godot, it also argues that Beckett’s interest in this nothing creates dynamics of failure and invention for the artist, their audience and their critics. Further, this chapter proposes that Beckett’s non-relational aesthetics asks us to attend closely to the impossible and the incomprehensible in performance.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Koczy
    • 1
  1. 1.Newcastle upon TyneUK

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