Advertisement

The Influence of the Discovery of Prehistoric Pile Dwellings Around the Alps on Architect Hannes Meyer

  • Hideo Tomita
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 809)

Abstract

The discovery of prehistoric pile dwellings in nineteenth-century Switzerland was enthusiastically welcomed by Swiss citizens. Based on the results of an excavation survey, in the 1920s, pile dwellings were reconstructed at Unteruhldingen, a small lakeside town by Lake Constance. This study clarifies the influence of the discovery of prehistoric pile dwellings on the architectural works of the modern Swiss architect Hannes Meyer (1889–1954), the second director of the Bauhaus. In terms of methodology, Sect. 2 outlines the process of reconstruction of pile dwellings around the Alps until the 1920s, and in Sect. 3, we analyze the influence of the pile dwellings on Meyer’s three major works in the 1920s based on both the architectural form and the design concept. As research materials, we used drawings and design concepts obtained from publication materials. From the drawing of the “Peters Schule” competition project (1926–27) and the ground floor plan of the “League of Nations” project, we can recognize that the buildings float upon pillars resembling piles of pile dwellings. In his masterpiece “ADGB Trade Union School” (1928–1930), Meyer finally explained the design concept using the word “modern pile-dwellers.” Thus, we can prove that the discovery of the pile-dwellings around the Alps and the subsequent reconstructions of the dwellings had influenced Meyer’s architectural design in the latter half of the 1920s.

Keywords

Bauhaus Pile dwelling Piloti Hannes meyer 

References

  1. 1.
    Desor, E.: Die Pfahlbauten des Neuenburger Sees, Adelmann, Frankfurt a. M. (1866)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Vogt, A. M.: Le Corbusier, Der edle Wilde, Zur Archäologie der Moderne, Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn, Braunschweig/Wiesbaden (1996), English. Ed, Le Corbusier, the noble savage: toward an archaeology of modernism. The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, London, England (1998)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Menotti, F.: The Pfahlbauproblem and the History of Lakedwelling Research in the Alps. Oxf. J. Archaeol. 20(4), 319–328 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Schöbel, G.: Die Pfahlbauten von Unteruhldingen. In: Museumsgeschichte der Pfahlbauten von Unteruhldingen, pp. 3–17. Pfahlbaumuseum Unteruhldingen, Unteruhldingen (2001)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Meyer, H.: Project for the Peter’s School, Basel, 1926. In: Schnaidt, C. (ed.) Hannes Meyer, Bauten, Projekte und Schriften, pp. 17–21. Verlag Arthur Niggli AG, Teufen AR/Schweiz (1965)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Meyer, H.: Project for the Palace of the League of Nations, Geneva, 1926–27. In: Schnaidt, C. (ed.) Hannes Meyer, Bauten, Projekte und Schriften, pp. 22–37. Verlag Arthur Niggli AG, Teufen AR/Schweiz (1965)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Meyer, H.: Federal School of the general German Trade Unions Federation, Bernau near Berlin, 1928–30. In: Schnaidt, C. (ed.) Hannes Meyer, Bauten, Projekte und Schriften, pp. 40–53. Verlag Arthur Niggli AG, Teufen AR/Schweiz (1965)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kyushu Sangyo UniversityFukuokaJapan

Personalised recommendations