Advertisement

The Mode of Integration to the World Economy

  • Ilan BizbergEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The manner in which any country inserts itself in the world economy is fundamental to characterize it, but it is even more important in the case of the peripheral countries, as they are much more dependent on the international market. For one thing, what a country produces is crucial, as countries that produce and export raw materials are extremely dependent on the developed countries as the demand and the prices of these materials are contingent on the needs of the countries that use them in their manufactures. Nonetheless, the countries can adopt defensive or proactive measures which are defined in terms of the degree of openness or protectionism, application of restrictions on foreign capital, the regulation of the exchange rate, capital controls, transfer of technology, among others.

Keywords

International insertion Openness Protectionism Dependency 

References

  1. Achtenberg, Emily. (2017, August 19). Why is Evo Morales Reviving Bolivia’s Controversial TIPNIS Road? NACLA Reporting on the Americas. https://nacla.org/blog/2017/08/22/why-evo-morales-reviving-bolivia%E2%80%99s-controversial-tipnis-road. Accessed 18 October 2018.
  2. African Development Bank Secretariat. (2009). What can the G20 do on trade that can benefit Africa? In R. Baldwin & S. Evenett (Eds.), The collapse of global trade, murky protectionism, and the crisis: Recommendations for the G20. London: VoxEU.org Publication/Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR).Google Scholar
  3. Auboin, M. (2009). Restoring trade finance: What the G20 can do. In R. Baldwin & S. Evenett (Eds.), The collapse of global trade, murky protectionism, and the crisis: Recommendations for the G20. London: VoxEU.org Publication/Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR).Google Scholar
  4. Baldwin, R., & Evenett, S. (Eds.). (2009). The collapse of global trade, murky protectionism, and the crisis: Recommendations for the G20. London: VoxEU.org Publication/Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR).Google Scholar
  5. Bekerman, M., & Dalmasso, G. (2014). Políticas productivas y competitividad industrial. El caso de Argentina y Brasil. Brazilian Journal of Political Economy, 34(1), 158–180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bensusán, G., & Moreno-Brid, J. C. (2012). El desempeño de las política macroeconómicas y laborales y las respuestas a la crisis internacional (1990–2010). In M. Puchet Anyul, M. Rojas, R. Salazar, G. Valenti & F. Valdés Ugarte (Eds.), América Latina en los albores del Siglo XXI: 2. Aspectos sociopolíticos. México: Flacso.Google Scholar
  7. Bouët, A., & Laborde, D. (2009). The potential cost of a failed Doha round. SSRN Electronic Journal. Available at SSRN:  https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1396335.
  8. Boyer, R. (2014). Is more equality possible in Latin America? A challenge in a world of contrasted but interdependent inequality regimes. DesiguALdades.net, Working Paper Series 67. Berlin: Freie Universität Berlin.Google Scholar
  9. Boyer, R. (2015). Économie politique des capitalismes, Théorie de la régulation et des crises. Paris: La Découverte.Google Scholar
  10. Brown, C. P. (2009). Protectionism is on the rise: Antidumping investigations. In R. Baldwin & S. Evenett (Eds.), The collapse of global trade, murky protectionism, and the crisis: Recommendations for the G20. London: VoxEU.org Publication/Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR).Google Scholar
  11. Cadestin, C., Gourdon, J., & Kowalski, P. (2016). Participation in Global Value Chains in Latin America: Implications for Trade and Trade-Related Policy (OECD Trade Policy Papers, No. 192). Paris: OECD Publishing.Google Scholar
  12. Chamon, M., & Garcia, M. (2016). Capital controls in Brazil: effective? Journal of International Money and Finance, (61), 163–187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Chiarini, T. (2016). A inercia estructural da base productiva brasileira: O IDE e a transferencia internacional de tecnologia. Revista de Economia Política, 36(2), 286–308.Google Scholar
  14. De la Torre, A., Ize, A., & Schmukler, S. L. (2012). Financial Development in Latin America and the Caribbean. The Road Ahead. IBRD, World Bank: Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  15. Drahokoupil, J., & Myant, M. (2015). Putting comparative capitalism research in its place: Varieties of capitalism in transition economies. In M. Ebenau, I. Bruff & C. May (Eds.), New directions in critical comparative capitalisms research. London: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  16. Dussel Peters, E. (2006). Hacia una política de competitividad en México. ECONOMÍA unam, 3(9), 65–81.Google Scholar
  17. Esquivel, G. (2010). De la inestabilidad macroeconómica al estancamiento estabilizador: el papel del diseño y la conducción de la política económica. In N. Lustig, Los grandes problemas de México. IX Crecimiento Económico y Equidad. México: El Colegio de México.Google Scholar
  18. Ffrench-Davis, R. (2008). Chile entre el neoliberalismo y el crecimiento con equidad. Reformas y políticas económicas desde 1973. Santiago: J. C. Sáez editor.Google Scholar
  19. Fritz, B. (2017). Conceptos Actuales del desarrollo económico y social: Opciones para Ecuador. Cámara de Comercio de Guayaquil, Ecuador: Power point.Google Scholar
  20. Gallagher, K. P. (2011). Trading away financial stability in Colombia: Capital controls and the US-Colombia trade agreement. SerieBrief, (66), Latin American Trade Network. http://www.ase.tufts.edu/gdae/Pubs/rp/Brief66_TradingAway_Gallagher.pdf. Accessed 15 May 2018.
  21. Gamberoni, E., & Newfarmer, R. (2009). Trade protection: Incipient but worrisome trends. In R. Baldwin & E. Simon (Eds.), The collapse of global trade, murky protectionism, and the crisis: Recommendations for the G20. London: VoxEU.org Publication/Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR).Google Scholar
  22. Ghosh, A. R., & Qureshi, M. S. (2016). What’s in a name? That which we call capital controls IMF. Working Paper 16/25. Available at: https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/wp/2016/wp1625.pdf. Accessed 15 May 2018.
  23. Hoshino, T. (2018). Red de proveeduría de la industria automotriz en México. ¿Es posible la incorporación de las empresas mexicanas? Guadalajara: Universidad de Guadalajara.Google Scholar
  24. Ibarra, C. (2008). La paradoja del crecimiento lento de México. Revista de la CEPAL, 95, 83–102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Ibarra, C. (2011). México: la maquila, el desajuste monetario y el crecimiento impulsado por las exportaciones. Revista CEPAL, 104, 199–215.Google Scholar
  26. Jeanneau, S., Tovar, C. E., & Moreno, R. (2007). Introduction. In S. Jeanneau, & C. E. Tovar. Evolving banking systems in Latin America and the Caribbean: challenges and implications for monetary policy and financial stability (BIS Papers No. 33, pp. 1–2). Basel, Switzerland: Monetary and Economic Department, Bank for International Settlements.Google Scholar
  27. Katzenstein, P. J. (1985). Small states in world markets industrial policy in Europe. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  28. Magud, N. E., Reinhart, C. M., & Rogoff, K. S. (2005). Capital controls: Myth and reality-a portfolio balance approach (Working paper). Oregon: University of Oregon, Economics Department.Google Scholar
  29. Martina, M. (2017, August 24). Exclusive: In China, the Party’s push for influence inside foreign firms stirs fears. Reuters. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-congress-companies/exclusive-in-china-the-partys-push-for-influence-inside-foreign-firms-stirs-fears-idUSKCN1B40JU. Accessed 15 May 2018.
  30. Nölke, A., & Vliegenthart, A. (2009). Enlarging the varieties of capitalism: The emergence of dependent market economies in East Central Europe. World Politics, 61(4), 670–702.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Palma, J. G. (2005). The seven main ‘stylized facts’ of the Mexican economy since trade liberalization and NAFTA. Industrial and Corporate Change, 14(6), 941–991.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Prates, D., Fritz, B., & de Paula, L. F. (2017). Brazil at crossroads: A critical assessment of developmentalist policies (Manuscript). Berlin: Freie University of Berlin.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Puyana, A., & Romero Tellaeche, J. (2009). México. De la crisis de la deuda al estancamiento económico. México: El Colegio de México.Google Scholar
  34. UNCTAD. (2013). World investment report, global value chains: Investment and trade for development. New York and Geneva: United Nations Publication.Google Scholar
  35. World Bank. (2018). Doing business 2018. Reforming to create jobs. Washington, DC: World Bank Publications.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.El Colegio de MéxicoMexico CityMexico

Personalised recommendations