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  • Nicole Curato
  • Marit Hammond
  • John B. Min
Chapter
Part of the Political Philosophy and Public Purpose book series (POPHPUPU)

Abstract

This chapter considers how the theory of deliberative power plays out in practice. Focussing on mini-publics as the main instantiation of deliberative democracy in action, this chapter discusses how deliberative forums both curb and potentially contribute to illegitimate power, and on this basis questions the extent to which they ought to be granted influence in formal politics. This question, however, can only be answered in a context-specific, dynamic, and critical manner.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicole Curato
    • 1
  • Marit Hammond
    • 2
  • John B. Min
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Deliberative Democracy and Global GovernanceUniversity of CanberraCanberraAustralia
  2. 2.School of Politics, Philosophy, International Relations and EnvironmentKeele UniversityKeeleUK
  3. 3.Department of Social Sciences – Philosophy ProgramCollege of Southern NevadaNorth Las VegasUSA

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