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Introduction

  • Seth C. Rasmussen
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Molecular Science book series (BRIEFSMOLECULAR)

Abstract

This introductory chapter presents an overview of the history of the gaseous hydrocarbons, including that of acetylene, which is the focus of the current volume. The isolation, synthesis, and applications of these species is presented, along with an introduction to the polymerization of unsaturated hydrocarbons.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Chemistry and BiochemistryNorth Dakota State UniversityFargoUSA

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