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A Legislator’s Inability to Legislate Different Species: A Swedish Case Study Concerning Mutual Insurance Companies

  • Jan Andersson
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter aims to contribute by focusing on legislation for the Swedish insurance industry in general and mutual insurance companies in particular. The Swedish legislation concerning insurance companies is twofold. The purpose of the case study is to investigate whether and, if so, to what extent the legislation differs as regards the regulation of different insurance companies and to what extent this regulatory discrepancy creates unwanted transaction costs and a divided level playing field for mutual insurance companies. Furthermore, this chapter aims to offer a short note on the idea of whether an alternative legislative scenario including a “separate law regime” and/or a “choice of law regime” could possibly benefit mutual insurance companies.

Keywords

Regulation Transaction costs Standard form contract Demand perspective Legal-systematic choice 

References

Swedish Government

  1. Regeringsdirektiv 2003:125.Google Scholar
  2. SOU 2006:55, Ny associationsrätt för försäkringsföretag.Google Scholar
  3. Proposition 2009/10:246 En ny försäkringsrörelselag.Google Scholar

Articles

  1. Andersson, J., in Produkt, utbud och efterfrågan – ett tema och en policy för bolagsrättslig lagstiftningsteknik, in Vänbok till Ingrid Arnesdotter – Uppsatser i affärsrättsliga frågor och om utbildning i affärsrätt, 2012 and in ABL – Monsters Inc.? Juridisk Publikation 01/2012.Google Scholar
  2. Andersson, J., and H. Almlöf. n.d. Related Party Transactions and the Swedish Investor Protection – More to it Than Meet the Eye (forthcoming article).Google Scholar
  3. Gordon, Jeffrey N. The Mandatory Structure of Corporate Law, 89 Colum. L. Rev [1989] 1549.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Larsson, M., and M. Lönnborg. Ömsesidig försäkringsverksamhet i den svenska modellen, NFT 1/2007. p. 86.Google Scholar

Web Material

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of LawStockholm UniversityStockholmSweden

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