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Acting Sound

  • Zachary Dunbar
  • Stephe Harrop
Chapter

Abstract

The re-performance of ancient drama requires a physical/vocal response attuned to the text’s rich seam of rhythms, breath patterns, complex shaping of dramatic verse, and the sensory qualities of words. This chapter examines the relationship of music and poetry in ancient Athens, and its performance culture. Most English-speaking actors probably will encounter the texts of tragedy via translation (a recent Australian production of Antigone offers the chapter’s main case study); however, this chapter argues that such encounters with ancient plays still require a deep excavation of musical and metrical structures, and their somatic promptings, providing a series of practical exercises to support this process.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zachary Dunbar
    • 1
  • Stephe Harrop
    • 2
  1. 1.Victorian College of the ArtsUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Liverpool Hope UniversityLiverpoolUK

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