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Spatial Humanities: An Integrated Approach to Spatiotemporal Research

  • David BlundellEmail author
  • Ching-Chih Lin
  • James X. Morris
Chapter
Part of the Computational Social Sciences book series (CSS)

Abstract

Spatial humanities are a sub-discipline of digital humanities based on geographic information systems (GIS) and timelines providing an effective integrating and contextualizing function for geo-cultural attributes. As information systems from multiple sources and in multiple formats they create visual indexes for diverse cultural data. Spatiotemporal interfaces provide new methods of integrating primary source materials into web-based interactive and 3D visualizations. We are able to chart the extent of specific traits of cultural information via maps using GIS gazetteer style spreadsheets for collecting and curating datasets.

The system is based on GIS point locations, routes, and regions linked to enriched attribute information. These are charted and visualized in maps and can be analyzed with network analysis, creating an innovative digital infrastructure for scholarly collaboration and creation of customizable visualizations. This method gives the researchers an expanse of data in layers of time across space providing new tools to advance humanistic inquiry. This in turn becomes a Web-based bulletin board for local community and scholarly knowledge exchange.

Keywords

Spatial humanities Geographic information systems (GIS) Asia-Pacific SpatioTemporal Institute (ApSTi) Innovative digital infrastructure Customized visualizations in dynamic maps Integrating and contextualizing function Community-generated datasets Remote sensing GIS-based religious studies Interactive graphics 

Notes

Acknowledgement

Appreciation is given to Lewis Lancaster, Jeanette Zerneke, and Michael Buckland for continuous support through ECAI. We are grateful to the kind patience and guidance of our ApSTi researchers and Shu-heng Chen, Vice President, and Director of Projects in Digital Humanities at National Chengchi University, Taipei.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Blundell
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Ching-Chih Lin
    • 3
  • James X. Morris
    • 4
  1. 1.Asia-Pacific SpatioTemporal Institute (ApSTi)National Chengchi UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  2. 2.Electronic Cultural Atlas Initiative (ECAI)University of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  3. 3.Graduate Institute of Religious StudiesNational Chengchi UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  4. 4.International Doctoral Program in Asia Pacific StudiesNational Chengchi UniversityTaipeiTaiwan

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