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The Teaching Methods and Modes of Communication

  • Georgina Barton
Chapter

Abstract

For some time research has purported to the fact that society and culture influences music itself. It has been further argued that the ways in which music is learnt and taught can reflect nuanced socio-cultural aspects. This chapter explores how beliefs and values are reflected in the music learning and teaching contexts. Socio-cultural influences can alter the ways in which teachers teach from one context to the other but more profoundly the culture frames a range of behaviours within the learning context, just as they influenced the methods of teaching and modes of communication. Socio-cultural elements are embedded within music learning and teaching across all situations and can change regularly or uphold tradition over time.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Georgina Barton
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Teacher Education and Early ChildhoodUniversity of Southern QueenslandSpringfield Central, BrisbaneAustralia

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