Advertisement

Introduction: Understanding Academic Writing in the Context of Central and Eastern European Higher Education

  • Claudia Ioana DoroholschiEmail author
  • Dumitru Tucan
  • Mădălina Chitez
  • Otto Kruse
Chapter
Part of the Multilingual Education book series (MULT, volume 29)

Abstract

Academic writing in Central and Eastern Europe remains an under-explored area in both teaching and research. While in many Western countries universities have long acknowledged the importance of writing support and research-based teaching implementations, in Eastern and Central Europe student writing has merely been seen as a personal skill that is acquired in school and improved by practice during university studies. Research in academic writing is therefore needed not only to understand this particularly dynamic and varied region, with its changing institutional landscape, but also to understand how to best facilitate or effect positive change. We wish the present collection of studies to be a first step in that direction.

References

  1. Applebaum, A. (2012). Iron curtain: The crushing of Eastern Europe (1944–1956). London: Allen Lane.Google Scholar
  2. Armour, I. D. (2013). A history of Eastern Europe: 1740–1918. Empires, nations and modernisation. London/New York: Bloomsbury Academic Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bardi, M., & Muresan, L. M. (2014). Changing academic writing practices in Romania: Perceptions and attitudes. In K. Bennett (Ed.), The semiperiphery of academic writing: Discourses, communities and practices (pp. 121–147). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Berend, I. T. (1986). The crisis zone of Europe. An interpretation of East-Central Europe history in the first half of the twentieth century. Cambridge/London/New York/New Rochelle/Melbourne/Sidney: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Berend, I. T. (1998). Decades of crisis: Central and Eastern Europe before World War II. Berkeley/Los Angeles/London: University of California PressGoogle Scholar
  6. Berend, I. T. (2003). History derailed. In Central and Eastern Europe in the long nineteenth century. Berkeley/Los Angeles/London: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  7. Berend, I. T. (2009). From the Soviet bloc to the European Union. The economic and social transformation of Central and Eastern Europe since 1973. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Bideleux, R., & Jeffries, I. (1998). A history of Eastern Europe. Crisis and change. London/New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  9. Borchin, M., & Doroholschi, C. (2016). Romania. In O. Kruse, M. Chitez, B. Rodriguez, & M. Castelló (Eds.), Exploring European writing cultures: Country reports on genres, writing practices and languages used in European higher education (pp. 179–200). Winterthur: ZHAW, Hochschul-online-Publikationen ZHAW. Available at:  https://doi.org/10.21256/zhaw-1056.Google Scholar
  10. Charle, C. (2004). Patterns. In W. Rüegg (Ed.), A history of the University in Europe, Vol. III: Universities in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (pp. 35–80). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Čmejrková, S. (1996). Academic writing in Czech and English. In E. Ventola & A. Mauranen (Eds.), Academic writing: Intercultural and textual issues (pp. 137–152). Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Dobbins, M., & Knill, C. (2009). Higher education policies in Central and Eastern Europe. Convergence toward a common model? in Governance. An International Journal of Policy. Administration, and Institutions, 22(3, July 2009), 397–430.Google Scholar
  13. Ekiert, G., & Hanson, S. E. (2003). Capitalism and democracy in Central and Eastern Europe. Assesing the legacy of communist rule. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Frucht, R. (2005). Eastern Europe. An introduction to the people, lands, and culture. Santa Barbara/Denver/Oxford: ABC Clio.Google Scholar
  15. Gonerko-Frej, A. (2014). Teaching academic writing for the global world in Poland: The ELF perspective. In K. Bennett (Ed.), The semiperiphery of academic writing: Discourses, communities and practices (pp. 75–90). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Harbord, J. (2010). Writing in Central and Eastern Europe: Stakeholders and directions in initiating change. Across the disciplines, 7. Retrieved from http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/articles/harbord2010.cfm [15 July 2014].
  17. Judt, T. (2005). Postwar. A history of Europe since 1945. New York: Penguin Press.Google Scholar
  18. Kruse, O., Chitez, M., Rodriguez, B., & Castelló, M. (Eds.). (2016). Exploring European writing cultures: Country reports on genres, writing practices and languages used in European higher education. Winterthur: ZHAW, Hochschul-online-Publikationen ZHAW. https://doi.org/10.21256/zhaw-1056.Google Scholar
  19. Machrzak, O., & Salski, Ł. (2016). Poland. In O. Kruse, M. Chitez, B. Rodriguez, & M. Castelló (Eds.), Exploring European writing cultures: Country reports on genres, writing practices and languages used in European higher education (pp. 149–162). Winterthur: ZHAW, Hochschul-online-Publikationen ZHAW Available at:  https://doi.org/10.21256/zhaw-1056.Google Scholar
  20. Naumann, F. (1915). Mitteleuropa. Berlin: Reimer.Google Scholar
  21. Neave, G. (2011). Patterns. In W. Rüegg (Ed.), A history of the University in Europe, Vol. IV: Universities since 1945 (pp. 31-65). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Okey, R. (2004). Eastern Europe: 1740–1985. Feudalism to communism. London/New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  23. Partsch, J. (1904). Mitteleuropa. Die Länder und Völker von den Westalpen und dem Balkan bis an den Kanal und das Kurische Haff. Gotha: Justhus Perthes.Google Scholar
  24. Petrić, B. (2014). English-medium journals in Serbia: Editors’ perspectives. In K. Bennett (Ed.), The semiperiphery of academic writing: Discourses, communities and practices (pp. 189–209). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Russell, D., & Foster, D. (2002). Rearticulating articulation. In D. Foster & D. Russell (Eds.), Writing and learning in cross-national perspective. Transitions from secondary to higher education (pp. 1–48). New York: Lawrence Erlbaum/ NCTE.Google Scholar
  26. Schöpflin, G., & Wood, N. (Eds.). (1989). In search of Central Europe. Totowa: Barnes and Noble.Google Scholar
  27. Sofianou-Mullen, F. (2016). Bulgaria. In O. Kruse, M. Chitez, B. Rodriguez, & M. Castelló (Eds.), Exploring European writing cultures: Country reports on genres, writing practices and languages used in European higher education (pp. 36–52). Winterthur: ZHAW, Hochschul-online-Publikationen ZHAW. Available at:  https://doi.org/10.21256/zhaw-1056.Google Scholar
  28. Swales, J. M. (1990). Genre analysis. English in academic and research settings.Cambridge: CUPGoogle Scholar
  29. Yakhontova, T., Kaluzhna, H., Fityo, T., Mazin, D., & Morenets, V. (2016). Ukraine. In O. Kruse, M. Chitez, B. Rodriguez, & M. Castelló (Eds.), Exploring European writing cultures: Country reports on genres, writing practices and languages used in European higher education (pp. 263–280). Winterthur: ZHAW, Hochschul-online-Publikationen ZHAW. Available at:  https://doi.org/10.21256/zhaw-1056.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claudia Ioana Doroholschi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Dumitru Tucan
    • 2
  • Mădălina Chitez
    • 1
  • Otto Kruse
    • 3
  1. 1.Faculty of Letters, History and Theology, Department of Modern Languages and LiteraturesWest University of TimișoaraTimișoaraRomania
  2. 2.Faculty of Letters, History and Theology, Department of Romanian StudiesWest University of TimișoaraTimișoaraRomania
  3. 3.Department of Applied Linguistics, Language Competence CentreZHAW Zurich University of Applied SciencesWinterthurSwitzerland

Personalised recommendations