Advertisement

Anticipation, Parallelisms and Convergences

  • Igor Popov
Chapter

Abstract

Phylogenetic anticipation means that organs or their rudiments evolve at an early stage of a group’s evolution, disappear at the next stages and later re-emerge either as adaptations or as a mark of a new evolutionary stage. A similar phenomenon is the emergence of aristogenes, organs useless for an organism but creating preconditions for the origin of “useful” organs in its distant descendants. Unlike “anticipatory” features, they do not disappear in the immediate descendants but continue to evolve although their adaptive significance does not become apparent for a long time. Anticipations and aristogenes can be considered as a case of parallelisms and/or convergences, which have always attracted orthogeneticists.

Keywords

Anticipation Aristogenes Parallelisms Convergences Adaptation 

References

  1. Baer KE von (1828) cited in Kryzhanovsky SG (1939) The principle of recapitulation and the conditions of historical understanding of development (an essay of the theory of historical heterogenesis) (Printsip rekapitulyatsii i usloviya istoricheskogo ponimaniya razvitiya [ocherk teorii istoricheskogo geterogenezisa]). In: In memory of academician A. N. Severtsov (Pamyati akademika A. N. Severtsova), v 1. AN SSSR, Moscow, Leningrad, p 281–383Google Scholar
  2. Bergson H (1998) Creative evolution (trans: Mitchell A). Dover Publications Inc., Mineola/New YorkGoogle Scholar
  3. Croizat L (1962) Space, Time, Form: The Biological Synthesis. Published by the author, CaracasGoogle Scholar
  4. Davitashvili LS (1948) The history of evolutionar palaeontology from Darwin to our days (Istoriya evolyutsionnoy paleontologii ot Darvina do nashikh dney). AN SSSR, Moscow/LeningradGoogle Scholar
  5. Dubinin NP (1966) The evolution of populations and radiation (Evolyutsiya populyatsiy i radiatsiya). Atomizdat, MoscowGoogle Scholar
  6. Filipchenko YA (1924) On parallelism in the living nature (O parallelizme v zhivoy prirode). Uspekhi sovremennoy biologii 4:242–257Google Scholar
  7. Grodnitsky DL (1995) The problems of functional interpretation of some identical morphological structures on insect wings and an explanation of secondary similarity of organisms (Problemy funktsional’noy interpretatsii nekotorykh odinakovykh morfologicheskikh struktur na kryl’yakh nasekomykh i ob’yasnenie vtorichnogo skhodstva organizmov). Zhurnal obshchey biologii 56(4):438–449Google Scholar
  8. Kappeler PM, Heymann EW (1996) Nonconvergence in the evolution of primate life history and socio-ecology. Biol J Linn Soc 59(3):297–326CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Moore J, Willmer P (1997) Convergent evolution in invertebrates. Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 72(1):1–61CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Pavlov AP (1901) The lower cretaceous of Russia and its fauna (Le Crétace inférieur de la Russie et sa faune). Nouv Mém Soc Nat Moscou 16(3): 1–87 cited in Berg LS (1977) Works on the theory of evolution (Trudy po teorii evolyutsii). Nauka, MoscowGoogle Scholar
  11. Ryzhikov KM, Oshmarin PG (1985) Convergencies in helminths and the question of relationships between the notions “convergence” and “parallelism” (Konvergentsii u gel'mintov i vopros o vzaimootnoshenii ponyatiy «konvergentsiya» i «parallelizm»). In: Morphological studies of animals (Morfologicheskie issledovaniya zhivotnykh). AN SSSR, Moscow, pp 179–189Google Scholar
  12. Schmalhausen, 1947 cited in Tatarinov LP (1976) Morphological evolution of teriodonts and general questions of phylogenetics (Morfologicheskaya evolyutsiya teriodontov i obshchie voprosy filogenetiki). Nauka, MoscowGoogle Scholar
  13. Simpson GG (1944) Tempo and mode in evolution. Columbia University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  14. Tatarinov LP (1976) Morphological evolution of teriodonts and general questions of phylogenetics (Morfologicheskaya evolyutsiya teriodontov i obshchie voprosy filogenetiki). Nauka, MoscowGoogle Scholar
  15. Tatarinov LP (1985) Palaeontology and the theory of evolution (Paleontologiya i teoriya evolyutsii). In: Morphological studies of animals (Morfologicheskie issledovaniya zhivotnykh). AN SSSR, Moscow, pp 229–427Google Scholar
  16. Vandel A (1972) The distribution of oniscoides (terrestrial isopod crustaceans) and continental drift (La répartition des Oniscoïdes [Crustacés Isopodes terrestres] et la dérive des continents) Comptes rendus de l‘Académie des Sciences 275: 2069–2072 cited in Nazarov VI (1984) Finalism in the modern evolutionary teaching (Finalizm v sovremennom evolyutsionnom uchenii). Nauka, MoscowGoogle Scholar
  17. Vorobyeva EI (1977) Morphology and characteristics of evolution of crossopterygian fishes (Morfologiya i osobennosti evolyutsii kisteperykh ryb). Trudy PIN, 163. Nauka, MoscowGoogle Scholar
  18. Went FW (1971) Parallel evolution. Taxon 20(2/3):197–226CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Willis JС (1940) The course of evolution by differentiation or divergent mutation rather than by selection. Cambridge Univ press, CambridgeCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Igor Popov
    • 1
  1. 1.Saint Petersburg State University, N. N. Petrov Research Institute of OncologySaint PetersburgRussia

Personalised recommendations