Advertisement

Mechanical Response and Damage Evolution of High-Strength Concrete Under Triaxial Loading

  • Brett WilliamsEmail author
  • William Heard
  • Steven Graham
  • Bradley Martin
  • Colin Loeffler
  • Xu Nie
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

Current weapons effects modeling efforts rely heavily on quasi-static triaxial data sets. However, there are fundamental knowledge gaps in the current continuum modeling approach due to limited experimental data in the areas of dynamic effects and damage evolution. Arbitrary scalar values used for damage parameters have experimentally unverified mathematical forms that often do not scale to different geometries, stress states, or strain rates. Although some preliminary tests have been performed through dynamic triaxial compression experiments, the results are difficult to interpret due to changes in specimen diameter and length-to-diameter ratio. In this study, a high-strength concrete (f’c ∼130 MPa) was investigated under triaxial loading conditions at confining pressures up to 300 MPa. Three cylindrical specimen sizes were used to determine size effects, including 50 × 114 mm, 25 × 50 mm, and 25 × 13 mm. For a limited number of specimens, X-Ray Computed Microtomography (XCMT) scans were conducted. It was noted that size and length-to-diameter ratio have substantial effects on the experimental results that must be understood to determine dynamic effects based on specimen geometries used in dynamic triaxial compression experiments. Additionally, by quantifying pore crushing and crack development under a variety of triaxial loading conditions, future multi-scale modeling efforts will be able to incorporate systematically defined damage parameters that are founded on experimental results.

Keywords

Triaxial loading High-strength concrete Damage Aspect ratio Micro-CT 

References

  1. 1.
    Williams, E.M., Graham, S.S., Reed, P.A., Rushing, T.S.: Laboratory characterization of Cor-Tuf concrete with and without steel fibers. U.S. Army Enineer Research and Development Center. (2009)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Mondal, A.B., Chen, W., Martin, B., Heard, W.: Dynamic Triaxial Compression Experiments on Cor-Tuf Specimens, in: Dynamic Behavior of Materials, vol. 1, pp. 245–249. Springer International Publishing, Cham (2013).  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-00771-7_30 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ozyildirim, C., Carino, N.J.: Chapter 13: Concrete Strength Testing. In: Significance of Tests and Properties of Concrete and Concrete-Making Materials, pp. 125–125–16. ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, PO Box C700, West Conshohocken, PA 19428–2959 (2006).  https://doi.org/10.1520/STP37731S
  4. 4.
    Loeffler, C., Williams, B.A., Heard, W.F., Martin, B., Nie, X.: 3-D damage characterization in heterogeneous materials. In: Society of Engineering Mechanics, pp. 1–3. US Army ERDC, Orlando (2016)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brett Williams
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • William Heard
    • 1
  • Steven Graham
    • 1
  • Bradley Martin
    • 3
  • Colin Loeffler
    • 2
  • Xu Nie
    • 2
  1. 1.U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development CenterVicksburgUSA
  2. 2.Southern Methodist UniversityDallasUSA
  3. 3.Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin AFBValparaisoUSA

Personalised recommendations