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Uncertainties in Low-Pressure Shock Experiments on Heterogeneous Materials

  • Tracy J. VoglerEmail author
  • Matthew Hudspeth
  • Seth Root
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

Understanding and quantifying the uncertainties in experimental results are crucial to properly interpreting simulations based on those results. While methods are reasonably well established for estimating those uncertainties in high-pressure shock experiments on homogeneous materials, it is much more difficult to treat relatively low-pressure experiments where shock rise times are significant and material strength is not negligible. Sample heterogeneity further complicates the issue, especially when that heterogeneity is not characterized in each sample. Here, we extend the Monte Carlo impedance matching approach used in high-pressure Z experiments to low-pressure experiments on heterogeneous porous materials. The approach incorporates uncertainties not only in the equation of state of the impedance matching standard but also those associated with its strength. In addition, we also examine approaches for determining material heterogeneity and evaluate its effect on the experimental results.

Keywords

Shock wave Porosity Uncertainty analysis Granular materials Heterogeneity 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International Inc. for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525.

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Copyright information

© The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sandia National LaboratoriesLivermoreUSA
  2. 2.Dynamic Material PropertiesSandia National LaboratoriesAlbuquerqueUSA

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