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High Strain Rate Response of Adhesively Bonded Fiber-Reinforced Composite Joints: A Computational Study to Guide Experimental Design

  • Suraj RavindranEmail author
  • Subramani Sockalingam
  • Addis Kidane
  • Michael Sutton
  • Brian Justusson
  • Jenna Pang
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

Adhesively bonded carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composite laminates are widely used in aerospace applications. During a high energy impact event, these laminates are often subjected to high strain rate loading. However, the influence of high strain rate loading on the response of these composite joints is not well understood. Computational finite element (FE) modeling and simulations are conducted to guide the design of high strain rate experiments. Two different experimental designs based on split Hopkinson bar were numerically modeled to simulate Mode I and Mode II types loading in the composite. In addition, the computational approach adopted in this study helps in understanding the high strain rate response of adhesively bonded composite joints subjected to nominally Mode I and Mode II loading. The modeling approach consists of a ply-level 3D FE model, a progressive damage constitutive model for the composite material behavior and a cohesive tie-break contact element for interlaminar delamination.

Keywords

Composite Adhesive joint Fracture Mode I Mode II 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The material is based upon work supported by NASA under Award No. NNL09AA00A. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

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Copyright information

© The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suraj Ravindran
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Subramani Sockalingam
    • 1
    • 2
  • Addis Kidane
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michael Sutton
    • 3
    • 2
    • 4
  • Brian Justusson
    • 5
  • Jenna Pang
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  2. 2.McNAIR Center for Aerospace Innovation and ResearchUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  4. 4.SC State Center for Mechanics, Materials and NDEUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  5. 5.Boeing Research & TechnologiesColumbiaUSA

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