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Revisit of Dynamic Brazilian Tests of Geomaterials

  • Brett SanbornEmail author
  • Elizabeth Jones
  • Matthew Hudspeth
  • Bo Song
  • Scott Broome
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

Understanding the dynamic behavior of geomaterials is critical for refining modeling and simulation of applications that involve impacts or explosions. Obtaining material properties of geomaterials is challenging, particularly in tension, due to the brittle and low-strength nature of such materials. Dynamic split tension technique (also called dynamic Brazilian test) has been employed in recent decades to determine the dynamic tensile strength of geomaterials. This is primarily because the split tension method is relatively straightforward to implement in a Kolsky compression bar. Typically, investigators use the peak load reached by the specimen to calculate the tensile strength of the specimen material, which is valid when the specimen is compressed at quasi-static strain rate. However, the same assumption cannot be safely made at dynamic strain rates due to wave propagation effects. In this study, the dynamic split tension (or Brazilian) test technique is revisited. High-speed cameras and digital image correlation (DIC) were used to image the failure of the Brazilian-disk specimen to discover when the first crack occurred relative to the measured peak load during the experiment. Differences of first crack location and time on either side of the sample were compared. The strain rate when the first crack is initiated was also compared to the traditional estimation method of strain rate using the specimen stress history.

Keywords

Brazilian test Geomaterials Kolsky bar Indirect tension Failure Kolsky bar Brazilian disk Indirect tension Brittle materials Rock Digital image correlation 

Notes

Acknowledgment

The Underground Nuclear Explosion Signatures Experiment (UNESE) was created to apply a broad range of research and development (R&D) techniques and technologies to nuclear explosion monitoring and nuclear nonproliferation. It is a multi-year research and development project sponsored by National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development, and is collaboratively executed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mission Support & Test Services, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories.

Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA-0003525.

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Copyright information

© The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brett Sanborn
    • 1
    Email author
  • Elizabeth Jones
    • 1
  • Matthew Hudspeth
    • 1
  • Bo Song
    • 1
  • Scott Broome
    • 1
  1. 1.Sandia National LaboratoriesAlbuquerqueUSA

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