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An Optimization-Based Approach to Design a Complex Loading Pattern Using a Modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar

  • Suhas VidhateEmail author
  • Atacan Yucesoy
  • Thomas J. Pence
  • Adam M. Willis
  • Ricardo Mejia-Alvarez
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

The split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique is used to characterize the mechanical response of a material during impact loading when a single stress wave pulse passes through that material [1]. The SHPB setup consists of two long bars: an incident bar and a transmission bar. The specimen, which needs to be characterized, is placed between these two bars. A striker propelled from a gas gun hits the incident bar generating a stress wave that propagates through the incident bar. A part of this wave is transmitted to the specimen and the transmission bar while the remaining part of the wave reflects back into the incident bar. By measuring the incident, transmitted, and reflected waves, the mechanical properties of the specimen are determined for high-strain-rate deformations.

Keywords

Split Hopkinson pressure bar Blast-induced traumatic brain injury Optimization Impact Finite element simulation 

References

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Copyright information

© The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suhas Vidhate
    • 1
    Email author
  • Atacan Yucesoy
    • 1
  • Thomas J. Pence
    • 1
  • Adam M. Willis
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ricardo Mejia-Alvarez
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  2. 2.Department of NeurologySan Antonio Military Medical CenterSam HoustonUSA

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