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Political Theory and Political Philosophy

  • Frank Cunningham
Chapter
Part of the Critical Political Theory and Radical Practice book series (CPTRP)

Abstract

In this chapter it is argued that, though often described as a political philosopher, Macpherson is better thought of as an engaged political theorist who remains agonistic about philosophical theories in ethics, social, or political philosophy. In explicating his political-theoretical methodology, the chapter addresses Macpherson’s conception of a good society, his unique conception of ‘social ontology,’ and the advantages for engaged political theory of his philosophical agnosticism.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank Cunningham
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Philosophy & Political ScienceUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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