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On Ecology and Global Environmental Change

  • Úrsula Oswald Spring
Chapter
Part of the Pioneers in Arts, Humanities, Science, Engineering, Practice book series (PAHSEP, volume 17)

Abstract

The world faces social and environmental crises together with an increasing risk of extreme events (IPCC 2012). These include economic crises, population growth, climate change, water scarcity and pollution, food crises (FAO 2000, 2016), soil depletion, erosion and desertification, urbanisation with slum development, rural-urban and international migration, physical and structural violence, gender, race and ethnic discrimination, youth unemployment, social and gender inequality, and an increasing loss of ecosystem services. The interaction of these multiple crises may result in extreme outcomes, especially for vulnerable people living in risky places, and may reduce their human, gender and environmental security.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Regional Centre for Multidisciplinary Research (CRIM)National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM)CuernavacaMexico

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