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Sustainable Development and Peace

  • Úrsula Oswald Spring
Chapter
Part of the Pioneers in Arts, Humanities, Science, Engineering, Practice book series (PAHSEP, volume 17)

Abstract

Sustainable development requires a deep understanding of peace and security that is centred on human beings. It includes a gender perspective of equality and equity, embedded in environmental concerns. This human, gender and environmental peace and security (Oswald Spring 2009; see book PAHSEP 18) – ‘HUGE’ – effort should be undertaken by millions of organised citizens, who seek a balance among humans and the natural environment for the benefit of future generations. A significant contribution to this goal of building a sustainable culture of peace is the Earth Charter (2000), which integrates concerns for a peaceful and sustainable future world. Such actions are orientated towards mitigation of the present environmental destruction by creating synergies for an engendered and sustainable peace-building (Chap.  6) that might be able to strengthen the long-standing and former more harmonious relationship between humankind and nature.

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© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Regional Centre for Multidisciplinary Research (CRIM)National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM)CuernavacaMexico

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