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Trends in Agricultural Production and Productivity Growth in India: Challenges to Sustainability

  • Ramakrushna Panigrahi
Chapter

Abstract

The classical theories of economic growth believe that production in the industrial sector is largely dependent on agriculture for contributing various factor inputs. Many theories have emerged supporting the phenomenal achievement in the Indian agriculture sector over the years. This chapter attempts to analyze the productivity growth in the Indian agricultural sector and provide a policy framework in the context of the profitability and sustainability of farming sector activities that employ two-thirds of India’s workforce.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Management InstituteBhubaneswarIndia

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