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Analysis of Factors of Advantages and Disadvantages in the Business Scenario of Northeast India: The Entrepreneur’s Perspective

  • Analjyoti Basu
  • Kalyan Adak
Chapter

Abstract

Past data for Northeast India reveals imbalanced regional growth. However, the situation is changing. The eight states in the region have surpassed Indian average GSDP growth of 4.74 on 2004–2005 prices (updated 19 August 2015 by Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Govt. of India). The region has almost 30% tribal population (27.27%, according to the 2011 census). The growth of the region depends largely on tribal population. The present study discusses the benefits and disadvantages faced by tribal entrepreneurs in the last five years in four densely populated tribal districts of Northeast India. We interviewed more than 150 tribal entrepreneurs from East Khasi Hills and Ri-Bhoi in Meghalaya, Churachandpur in Manipur, and Aizawl in Mizoram. These districts have tribal populations of more than two lakhs and tribal population densities of more than 80%.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Entrepreneurship Development Institute of IndiaGandhinagarIndia
  2. 2.Commerce DepartmentGovernment Hrangbana College, Mizoram UniversityAizawlIndia

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