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Parenting and Family Intervention in Treatment

  • Robert J. McMahon
  • Dave S. Pasalich
Chapter

Abstract

The primary purpose of this chapter is to present and critically evaluate current family-based treatments for conduct problems (CP) in children and adolescents. The first section of the chapter describes the theoretical underpinnings of CP and key family factors and processes in the development and maintenance of CP, as well as a brief description of selected family-based interventions for CP with children and adolescents. We then summarize the extensive evidence base for family-based interventions for child and adolescent CP, with discussion of both its strengths and limitations. We focus on generalization and social validity, comparison studies, mechanisms and moderation, various implementation issues, and economic analyses. The chapter concludes with suggestions for future research, policy, and practice. Areas for future research include the personalization of family-based treatments, technology-based interventions, treatment fidelity, and the amalgamation of social learning-based interventions with those derived from alternative theoretical conceptualizations. Future directions for policy and practice include the need to select evidence-based interventions, recognition of family-based treatment as a core intervention for youth CP, family-based treatment as prevention, and implementation in real-world settings.

Keywords

Conduct problems Parent management training Family-based treatment Social learning theory Parent–child relationship 

Notes

Acknowledgement

Support for the preparation of the manuscript was provided to Robert J. McMahon by a LEEF B.C. Leadership Chair award, Child & Family Research Institute Investigator Salary and Investigator Establishment Awards, and a Canada Foundation for Innovation award. Support to Dave S. Pasalich was provided by a Discovery Early Career Researcher Award from the Australian Research Council.

Disclosure The authors declare that they have no disclosure.

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© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologySimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  2. 2.B.C. Children’s HospitalVancouverCanada
  3. 3.Research School of PsychologyThe Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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