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Samuel Beckett’s Molloy

  • Antoine Dechêne
Chapter
Part of the Crime Files book series (CF)

Abstract

Beckett’s Molloy provides an interesting standpoint from where to analyze the close connection that exists between the grotesque and the abject as well as the motif of the “strange loop,” while also humorously capturing the potential dehumanization, the perpetual disintegration and privation of the human becoming inhuman in an endless process of non-becoming. In this chapter, I focus on Molloy’s grotesque behaviors and the abject depictions of his body. I also discuss, through the character of Moran, how Beckett’s detectives can be seen as other “William Wilsons,” doubles who do not only mirror but also influence each other. The chapter concludes with a brief analysis of the use of language in the novel.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antoine Dechêne
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LiègeLiègeBelgium

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