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“Let’s Play Catch Together”: Full-Body Interaction to Encourage Collaboration Among Hearing-Impaired Children

  • Naoki Komiya
  • Mikihiro Tokuoka
  • Ryohei Egusa
  • Shigenori Inagaki
  • Hiroshi Mizoguchi
  • Miki Namatame
  • Fusako Kusunoki
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10896)

Abstract

For hearing-impaired children, interaction with others is often suppressed due to their struggle to communicate vocally, which is the primary tool of communication for most children. This limits hearing-impaired children’s opportunities to develop social skills. We have developed a prototype system that supports hearing-impaired children’s acquisition of social skills. This system encourages collaborative play, using visual information and full-body interaction, with the aim of supporting the hearing-impaired child’s acquisition of social skills. We evaluated this system for empathy, negative feelings, and behavioral involvement. The result of this evaluation suggests that this system provides opportunities for collaboration, supporting the hearing-impaired child’s acquisition of social skills.

Keywords

Collaboration Hearing-impaired children Full-body interaction Social skills Kinect sensor 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naoki Komiya
    • 1
  • Mikihiro Tokuoka
    • 1
  • Ryohei Egusa
    • 2
    • 3
  • Shigenori Inagaki
    • 3
  • Hiroshi Mizoguchi
    • 1
  • Miki Namatame
    • 4
  • Fusako Kusunoki
    • 5
  1. 1.Tokyo University of ScienceNodaJapan
  2. 2.Japan Society for the Promotion of ScienceTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Kobe UniversityKobeJapan
  4. 4.Tsukuba University of TechnologyTsukubaJapan
  5. 5.Tama Art UniversityHachiojiJapan

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