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Accessible eLearning - eLearning for Accessibility/AT

Introduction to the Special Thematic Session
  • E. A. Draffan
  • Peter Heumader
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10896)

Abstract

The special thematic session on eLearning for accessibility and assistive technologies is made up of a wide range of papers that illustrate a variety of approaches to teaching and learning that comes under the title ‘eLearning’ such as gamification, use of apps, online presentation tools and MOOCS. Successful inclusion of those with disabilities as well as those who wish to enhance their knowledge can be achieved by ensuring ease of access to the platform of choice, the type of content available, whilst enhancing user motivation and appreciation.

Keywords

eLearning Gamification MOOCs Online learning  Accessibility 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.WAIS, ECS, University of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK
  2. 2.University of LinzLinzAustria

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