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Bronchiectasis

  • Adam Hill
Chapter

Abstract

Bronchiectasis is being diagnosed with increased frequency due to improved awareness and better imaging with modern multi-slice CT scanners. This chapter discusses the investigation, diagnosis and management of clinically significant bronchiectasis in adults. This is defined as patients having symptoms of at least regular cough and sputum production, with CT confirmation of bronchiectasis.

Keywords

Bronchiectasis Adult Clinically significant Investigation Management 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Royal Infirmary and University of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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