Advertisement

Terrestrial and Inland-water Invertebrates of the Australian Arid Zone

  • Jonathan D. Majer
  • Mark S. Harvey
  • W. F. Humphreys
  • Jenny A. Davis
  • Alan L. Yen
Chapter

Abstract

Life on earth consists of a wondrous array of organisms, from bacteria and viruses, to redwoods and whales. But it’s the invertebrates – those animals without a backbone – that have diversified most notably. Wilson (1987) called them the ‘little things that run the world’ and made a call to arms to bring invertebrate conservation to the forefront of our minds.

References

  1. Abrams KM, Guzik MT, Cooper SJ, Humphreys WF, King RA, Cho JL, Austin AD (2012) What lies beneath: molecular phylogenetics and ancestral state reconstruction of the ancient subterranean Australian Parabathynellidae (Syncarida, Crustacea). Mol Phylogenet Evol 64:130–144PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. ABRS (2013a) ‘Bon Bon Station Reserve SA 24–30 October 2010’. A Bush Blitz survey report, ABRS, Commonwealth of AustraliaGoogle Scholar
  3. ABRS (2013b) ‘Witchelina Reserve SA 10–23 October 2010’. A Bush Blitz survey report, ABRS, Commonwealth of AustraliaGoogle Scholar
  4. ABRS (2014a) ‘Cane River Conservation Park WA 20 June–1 July 2011’. A Bush Blitz survey report, Commonwealth of AustraliaGoogle Scholar
  5. ABRS (2014b) ‘Neds Corner Station Victoria 2011’. A Bush Blitz survey report, Commonwealth of AustraliaGoogle Scholar
  6. ABRS (2015a) ‘Henbury Station Northern Territory, 12–24 May 2013’. A Bush Blitz survey report, Commonwealth of AustraliaGoogle Scholar
  7. ABRS (2015b) ‘Hiltaba Nature Reserve Gawler Ranges National Park SA 12–23 November 2012’. A Bush Blitz survey report, ABRS, Commonwealth of AustraliaGoogle Scholar
  8. ABRS (2015c) Credo Station Reserve WA 29 August–9 September 2011’. A Bush Blitz survey report, ABRS, Commonwealth of AustraliaGoogle Scholar
  9. Andersen AN, Yen AL (1985) Immediate effects of fire on ants in the semi-arid mallee region of North-Western Victoria. Aust J Ecol 10:25–30CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Andersen AN, Woinarski JCZ, Parr CL (2012) Savanna burning for biodiversity: fire management for faunal composition in Australian tropical savannas. Austral Ecol 37:658–667CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Andersen AN, Ribbons RR, Pettit M, Parr CL (2014) Burning for biodiversity: highly resilient ant communities respond only to strongly contrasting fire regimes in Australia’s seasonal tropics. J Appl Ecol 51:1406–1413CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Baehr BC, Harvey MS, Burger M, Thoma M (2012) The new Australasian goblin spider genus Prethopalpus (Araneae, Oonopidae). Bull Am Mus Nat Hist 763:1–113CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Baker WH (1914) Crustacea. Trans R Soc S Aust 38:446–447Google Scholar
  14. Barker WR, Greenslade PJM (1982) Evolution of the flora and fauna of arid Western Australia. Peacock Publications, FrewvilleGoogle Scholar
  15. Bayly, IAE (2002) The life of temporary waters in Australian gnammas (rockholes) Verh. Internat Verein Limnol 28:41–48Google Scholar
  16. Beard JS (1990) Plant life of Western Australia. Kangaroo Press, PerthGoogle Scholar
  17. Bednall WF (1892) Land and fresh water Mollusca. Trans R Soc S Aust 16:62–67Google Scholar
  18. Bednall WF (1894) On a new land shell from Central Australia. Trans R Soc S Aust 18:190Google Scholar
  19. Bergoth E (1916) Heteropterous Hemiptera collected by Professor W. Baldwin Spencer during the Horn expedition in Central Australia. Proc R Soc Victoria 29:19–39Google Scholar
  20. Biological Surveys Committee (1984–1995) The biological survey of the Eastern Goldfields of Western Australia, parts 1–12. Records of the Western Australian Museum. Supplement(s) 18, 30,31,40,41,42,47,49Google Scholar
  21. Blackburn T (1892) Coleoptera. Trans R Soc S Aust 16:16–61Google Scholar
  22. Blackburn T (1893) Coleoptera (continued). Trans R Soc S Aust 16:177–202Google Scholar
  23. Blackburn T (1895) Further notes on Australian Coleoptera, with descriptions of new genera and species. Trans R Soc S Aust 19:27–60Google Scholar
  24. Blackburn T (1896) Coleoptera. In: Spencer B (ed) Report on the work of the Horn scientific expedition to Central Australia, part 2. Melville, Mullen and Slade, Melbourne, pp 254–308Google Scholar
  25. Bogan MT, Noriega-Felix N, Vidal-Aguilar SL, Findley LT, Lytle DA, Gutierrez-Ruacho OG, Alvarado-Castro JA, Varela-Romero A (2014) Biogeography and conservation of aquatic fauna in spring-fed tropical canyons of the southern Sonoran Desert, Mexico. Biodivers Conserv 23:2705–2748CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Boulton AJ, Brock MA, Robson BJ, Chambers JM, Ryder DS, Davis JA (2014) Australian freshwater ecology. Wiley-Blackwell, ChichesterGoogle Scholar
  27. Brim Box J, Duguid A, Read RE, Kimber RG, Knapton A, Davis J, Bowland AE (2008) Central Australian waterbodies: the importance of permanence in a desert land- scape. J Arid Environ 72:1395–1413CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Brim-Box J, Davis J, Strehlow K, McBurnie G, Duguid A, Brock C, McConnell K, Day C, Palmer C (2014) Persistence of central Australian aquatic invertebrate communities. Mar Freshw Res 65:562–572CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Brooks D (2003) A town like Mparntwe. IAD Press, Alice SpringsGoogle Scholar
  30. Brown L, Finston T, Humphreys G, Eberhard S, Pinder A (2015) Groundwater oligochaetes show complex genetic patterns of distribution in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Invertebr Syst 29:405–420CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Burbidge AH, Harvey MS, McKenzie NL (2000) Biodiversity survey of the southern Carnarvon Basin. Rec West Aust Mus Suppl 61:1–595Google Scholar
  32. Byrne M, Yeates DK, Joseph L, Kearney M, Bowler J, Williams MAJ, Cooper S, Donnellan SC, Keogh JS, Leys R, Melville J, Murphy DJ, Porch N, Wyrwoll K-H (2008) Birth of a biome: insights into the assembly and maintenance of the Australian arid zone biota. Mol Ecol 17:4398–4417PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Byrne M, Steane DA, Joseph L, Yeates DK, Jordan GJ, Crayn D, Aplin K, Cantrill DJ, Cook LG, Crisp MJ, Keogh JS, Melville J, Moritz C, Porch N, Sniderman JMK, Sunnucks P, Weston PH (2011) Decline of a biome: evolution, contraction, fragmentation, extinction and invasion of the Australian mesic zone biota. J Biogeogr 38:1635–1656CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Callan SK, Majer JD, Edwards K, Moro D (2011) Documenting the terrestrial invertebrate fauna of Barrow Island, Western Australia. Aust J Entomol 50:323–343CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Campbell TG (1926) Insect foods of the Aborigines. Aust Mus Mag 1:407–410Google Scholar
  36. Chapman AD (2009) Numbers of living species in Australia and the world. Australian Biological Resources Study, CanberraGoogle Scholar
  37. Chilton C (1917) Crustacea. Trans R Soc S Aust 41:475–482Google Scholar
  38. Cho J-L, Humphreys WF, Lee S-D (2006) Phylogenetic relationships within the genus Atopobathynella Schminke, 1973 (Bathynellacea, Parabathynellidae): with the description of six new species from Western Australia. Invertebr Syst 20:9–41CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Cooper SJB, Hinze S, Leys R, Watts CHS, Humphreys WF (2002) Islands under the desert: molecular systematics and evolutionary origins of stygobitic water beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) from Central Western Australia. Invertebr Syst 16:589–598CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Cooper SJB, Bradbury JH, Saint KM, Leys R, Austin AD, Humphreys WF (2007) Subterranean archipelago in the Australian arid zone: mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of amphipods from Central Western Australia. Mol Ecol 16:1533–1544PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Cooper SJ, Saint KM, Taiti S, Austin AD, Humphreys WF (2008) Subterranean archipelago II: mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of stygobitic isopods (Oniscidea: Haloniscus) from the Yilgarn region of Western Australia. Invertebr Syst 22:195–206CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Criscione F, Köhler F (2016) Snails in the desert: assessing the mitochondrial and morphological diversity and the influence of aestivation behavior on lineage differentiation in the Australian endemic Granulomelon Iredale, 1933 (Stylommatophora: Camaenidae). Mol Phylogenet Evol 94:101–112PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Davis JA (1997) Conservation of aquatic invertebrate communities in Central Australia. Mem Mus Victoria 56:491–503CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Davis JA, Harrington SA, Friend JA (1993) Invertebrate communities of relict streams in the arid zone: the George Gill Range, Central Australia. Aust J Mar Freshwat Res 44:483–505CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Davis JA, Pavlova A, Thompson R, Sunnucks P (2013a) Evolutionary refugia and ecological refuges: key concepts for conserving Australian arid zone freshwater biodiversity under climate change. Glob Chang Biol 19:1970–1984PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Davis J, Sunnucks P, Thompson R, Sim L, Pavlova A, Morán-Ordóñez A, Brim Box J, McBurnie, G, Pinder A, Choy S, McNeil D, Hughes J, Sheldon F, Timms B (2013b) Building the climate resilience of arid zone freshwater biota, National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, Gold Coast. NCCARF Publication 111/13Google Scholar
  47. Devitt J (1986) A taste for honey: Aborigines and the collection of ants associated with Mulga in Central Australia. In: Sattler PS (ed) The Mulga lands. Royal Society of Queensland, Brisbane, pp 40–44Google Scholar
  48. Dobrowski SZ (2011) A climatic basis for microrefugia: the influence of terrain on climate. Glob Chang Biol 17:1022–1035CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Dunlop JN, Majer JD, Morris CJ, Walker KJ (1985) A preliminary assessment of minesite rehabilitation in the Pilbara iron ore province using ant communities as ecological indicators. Mulga Res Cent J 8:25–31Google Scholar
  50. Eyre EJ (1845) Journals of expeditions o discovery into Central Australia and overland from Adelaide to King George’s Sound in the years 1840–1, vol 1 and 2. T. and W. Boone, LondonGoogle Scholar
  51. Fensham R, Silcock JL, Kerezsy A, Ponder W (2011) Four desert waters: setting arid zone wetland conservation priorities through understanding patterns of endemism. Biol Conserv 144:2459–2467CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Finston TL, Johnson M, Humphreys WF, Eberhard S, Halse S (2007) Cryptic speciation in two widespread subterranean amphipod genera reflects historical drainage patterns in an ancient landscape. Mol Ecol 16:355–365PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Finston T, Francis CJ, Johnson MS (2009) Biogeography of the stygobitic isopod Pygolabis (Malacostraca: Tainisopidae) in the Pilbara, Western Australia: evidence for multiple colonisations of the groundwater. Mol Phylogenet Evol 52:448–460PubMedCrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  54. Froggatt WW (1893) Hymenoptera. Trans R Soc S Aust 16:69–73Google Scholar
  55. Froggatt WW (1896) Honey ants. In: Spencer B (ed) Report on the work of the Horn scientific expedition to Central Australia, Part 2. Melville. Mullen and Slade, Melbourne, pp 385–392Google Scholar
  56. Froggatt W (1898) Australian Termitidae. Part III. Proc Linnean Soc NSW 22:721–758Google Scholar
  57. Froggatt WW (1901) Typical insects of Central Australia. Agric Gaz NSW 12:1203–1212Google Scholar
  58. Froggatt WW (1903) Insects used as food by the Australian natives. Sci Man 6:11–13Google Scholar
  59. Froggatt WW (1907) Australian insects. William Books and Co. Ltd., SydneyGoogle Scholar
  60. Froggatt WW (1914) Insecta: Hymenoptera. Trans R Soc S Aust 38:459Google Scholar
  61. George AS, McKenzie NL, Doughty P (2010) A biodiversity survey of the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Rec West Aust Mus Suppl 78:1–311Google Scholar
  62. Giles E (1889) Australia twice traversed. Sampson Low, Marston, Searle and Rivington, LondonGoogle Scholar
  63. Gollan JR, Ramp D, Ashcroft MB (2014) Assessing the distribution and protection status of types of cool environment to facilitate their conservation under climate change. Conserv Biol 28:456–466PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Greenslade P (1978a) Collembola. In: Low WA, Milllington RW, Winkworth RE, Sullivan ME, Johnson D, Wright MJ, Lendon C, Ross MA, Watson JAL, Barrett RA, Greenslade PJM, Low BS (eds) The physical and biological features of Kunoth Paddock in Central Australia. CSIRO division of land management technical paper 4, pp 114–123Google Scholar
  65. Greenslade PJM (1978b) Ants. In: Low WA, Milllington RW, Winkworth RE, Sullivan ME, Johnson D, Wright MJ, Lendon C, Ross MA, Watson JAL, Barrett RA, Greenslade PJM, Low BS (eds) The physical and biological features of Kunoth Paddock in Central Australia. CSIRO Australia, division land management technical paper 4 4, pp 109–113Google Scholar
  66. Greenslade PJM (1979) A guide to ants of South Australia. South Australian Museum, AdelaideGoogle Scholar
  67. Greenslade P (1981) Survival of Collembola in arid environments, observations in South Australia and the Sudan. J Arid Environ 4:219–228Google Scholar
  68. Greenslade P (1982) Origins of the collembolan fauna of arid Australia. In: Barker WR, Greenslade PJM (eds) Evolution of the flora and fauna of arid Australia. Peacock Publications, Adelaide, pp 267–272Google Scholar
  69. Greenslade P (1985a) Terrestrial invertebrates of the mound spring bores, creek beds and other habitats. In: Greenslade PJM, Joseph L, Reeves A (eds) South Australia’s mound springs. Nature Conservation Society of South Australia Inc, Adelaide, pp 64–77Google Scholar
  70. Greenslade PJM (1985b) First report on ants and post-fire succession in the Tanami Desert, N. T. CSIRO Division of Soils, Technical Memorandum 21/1985, pp 1–21Google Scholar
  71. Greenslade PJM, Greenslade P (1983) Ecology of soil invertebrates. In: Lee K (ed) Soils: an Australian viewpoint. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, pp 645–649Google Scholar
  72. Greenslade PJM, Greenslade P (1984) Soil surface insects of the Australian arid zone In: Cogger H, Cameron EE (ed) Arid Australia. Proceedings of the Museum sesquicentennial symposium on Australian Deserts, September 1976, Sydney, pp 153–176Google Scholar
  73. Greenslade PJM, Greenslade P (1989) Ground layer invertebrate fauna. In: Noble JC, Bradstock RA (eds) Mediterranean landscapes in Australia: mallee ecosystems and their management. CSIRO Publishing, East Melbourne, pp 266–284Google Scholar
  74. Gunawardene NR, Majer JD (2004) Ants of the southern Carnarvon Basin, Western Australia: an investigation into patterns of association. Rec West Aust Mus 22:219–239CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Gunawardene NR, Majer JD (2005) The effect of fire on ant assemblages in the Gibson Desert Nature Reserve, Western Australia. J Arid Environ 63:725–739CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  76. Gunawardene NR, Majer JD, Taylor CK, Harvey MS (eds) (2013) The terrestrial invertebrate fauna of Barrow Island, Western Australia. Rec West Aust Mus Suppl 83:1–406Google Scholar
  77. Guzik MT, Abrams K, Cooper SJB, Humphreys WF, Cho J-L, Austin A (2008) Phylogeography of the ancient Parabathynellidae (Crustacea: Bathynellacea) from the Yilgarn region of Western Australia. Subterranean connections. Invertebr Syst 22:205–216CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Guzik MT, Cooper SJB, Humphreys WF, Austin AD (2009) Fine-scale comparative phylogeography of a sympatric sister species triplet of subterranean diving beetles from a single calcrete aquifer in Western Australia. Mol Ecol 18:3683–3698PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Guzik M, Austin AD, Cooper SJB, Harvey MS, Humphreys WF, Bradford T, Eberhard SM, King RA, Leijs R, Muirhead KA, Tomlinson M (2010) Is the Australian subterranean fauna uniquely diverse? Invertebr Syst 24:407–418CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. Halse SA, Pearson GB (2014) Troglofauna in the vadose zone: comparison of scraping and trapping results and sampling adequacy. Subterranean Biol 13:17–34CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. Halse SA, Scanlon M, Cocking JS, Barron HJ, Richardson JB, Eberhard SM (2014) Pilbara stygofauna: deep groundwater of an arid landscape contains globally significant radiation of biodiversity. Rec West Aust Mus Suppl 78:443–483CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  82. Hamilton Z, Johnson MS (2015) Hybridization between genetically and morphologically divergent forms of Rhagada (Gastropoda: Camaenidae) snails at a zone of secondary contact. Biol J Linn Soc 114:348–362CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Harrison SE, Guzik M, Harvey MS, Austin AD (2014) Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Western Australian troglobitic chthoniid pseudoscorpions (Pseudoscorpiones : Chthoniidae) points to multiple independent subterranean clades. Invertebr Syst 28:386–400Google Scholar
  84. Harvey MS (1992) The Schizomida (Chelicerata) of Australia. Invertebr Taxon 6:77–129CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. Harvey MS (2002) Short-range endemism in the Australian fauna: some examples from non-marine environments. Invertebr Syst 16:555–570CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  86. Harvey MS, Edward KL (2007) A review of the pseudoscorpion genus Ideoblothrus (Pseudoscorpiones, Syarinidae) from western and northern Australia. J Nat Hist 41:445–472CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  87. Harvey MS, Yen AL (1989) Worms to wasps: an illustrated guide to Australia’s terrestrial invertebrates. Oxford University Press, MelbourneGoogle Scholar
  88. Harvey M, Berry O, Edward KL, Humphreys G (2008) Molecular and morphological systematics of hypogean schizomids (Schizomida: Hubbardiidae) in semi-arid Australia. Invertebr Syst 22:167–194CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. Harvey MS, Rix MG, Framenau VW, Hamilton ZR, Johnson MS, Teale RJ, Humphreys G, Humphreys WF (2011) Protecting the innocent: studying short-range endemic taxa enhances conservation outcomes. Invertebr Syst 25(1):10CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  90. Hickman VV (1944) The Simpson Desert expedition, 1939 – scientific reports. no. 1, biology: scorpions and spiders. Trans R Soc S Aust 68:18–48Google Scholar
  91. Hogg HR (1896) Araneidae. In: Spencer (ed) Report on the work of the Horn scientific expedition to Central Australia, part 2. Melville, Mullen and Slade, Melbourne, pp 309–356Google Scholar
  92. Humphreys WF (1991) Experimental re-establishment of pulse-driven populations in a terrestrial troglobite community. J Anim Ecol 60:609–623CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  93. Humphreys WF (ed) (1993) The biogeography of cape range, Western Australia. Rec West Aust Mus Suppl 45:1–248Google Scholar
  94. Humphreys WF (1999) Relict stygofaunas living in sea salt, karst and calcrete habitats in arid northwestern Australia contain many ancient lineages. In: Ponder W, Lunney D (eds) The Other 99%. The Conservation and Biodiversity of Invertebrates. Transactions of the Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, Mosman, pp 219–227CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  95. Humphreys WF (2001) Groundwater calcrete aquifers in the Australian arid zone: the context to an unfolding plethora of stygal biodiversity. In: Humphreys WF, Harvey M (eds) Subterranean biology in Australia 2000. Rec West Aust Mus Suppl 64:63–83Google Scholar
  96. Humphreys WF (2006) Aquifers: the ultimate groundwater dependent ecosystems. In: Eamus D (ed) Special edition on groundwater dependent ecosystems. Aust J Bot 54:115–132Google Scholar
  97. Humphreys WF (2008) Rising from down under: developments in subterranean biodiversity in Australia from a groundwater fauna perspective. Invertebr Syst 22:85–101CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  98. Humphreys WF (2012) Diversity patterns in Australia. In: White WB, Culver DC (eds) Encyclopedia of caves, 2nd edn. Academic, San Diego, pp 203–219CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  99. Humphreys WF, Adams M (2001) Allozyme variation in the troglobitic millipede Stygiochiropus communis (Diplopoda: Paradoxosomatidae) from arid tropical cape range, northwestern Australia: population structure and implications for the management of the region. In: Humphreys WF, Harvey MS (eds) Subterranean biology in Australia 2000. Rec West Aust Mus Supple 64:15–36Google Scholar
  100. Humphreys WF, Watts CHS, Cooper SJB, Leijs R. (2009) Groundwater estuaries of salt lakes: buried pools of endemic biodiversity on the western plateau, Australia. Hydrobiologia 626:79–95. Erratum: Hydrobiologia 632:377Google Scholar
  101. Javidkar M (2014) Molecular systematics and biogeographic history of oniscidean isopod troglofauna in groundwater calcretes of Central Western Australia. PhD dissertation. Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity, University of Adelaide, South AustraliaGoogle Scholar
  102. Javidkar M, Steven JB, Cooper RA, King HWF, Austin AD (2015) Molecular phylogenetic analyses reveal a new southern hemisphere oniscidean family (Crustacea: Isopoda) with a unique water transport system. Invertebr Syst 29:554–577CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  103. Johnson MS, Hamilton Z, Murphy CE, MacLeay CA, Roberts B, Kendrick PG (2004) Evolutionary genetics of island and mainland species of Rhagada (Gastropoda: Pulmonata) in the Pilbara region, Western Australia. Aust J Zool 52:341–355CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  104. Johnson M, Hamilton Z, Teale RJ, Kendrick PG (2012) Endemic evolutionary radiation of Rhagada land snails (Pulmonata: Camaenidae) in a continental archipelago in northern Western Australia. Biol J Linn Soc 106:316–327CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. Keppel G, Wardell-Johnson G (2012) Refugia: keys to climate change management. Glob Chang Biol 18:2389–2391CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  106. King RA (2009) Two new genera and species of chiltoniid amphipods (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Talitroidea) from freshwater mound springs in South Australia. Zootaxa 2293:35–52Google Scholar
  107. King R, Bradford T, Austin AD, Humphreys WF, Cooper SJB (2012) Divergent molecular lineages and not-so-cryptic species: the first descriptions of stygobitic chiltoniid amphipods (Talitroidea: Chiltoniidae) from Western Australia. J Crustac Biol 32:465–488CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  108. Kirby WF (1896) Hymenoptera. In: Spencer B (ed) Report on the work of the Horn scientific expedition to Central Australia, part 2. Melville, Mullen and Slade, Melbourne, pp 203–209Google Scholar
  109. Kodric-Brown A, Brown JH (2007) Native fishes, exotic mammals, and the conservation of desert springs. Front Ecol Environ 5:549–553CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  110. Langlands PR, Brennan KEC, Pearson DJ (2006) Spiders, spinifex rainfall and fire: long-term changes in an arid spider assemblage. J Arid Environ 67:36–59CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  111. Langlands PR, Brennan KEC, Framenau VW, Main BY (2011) Predicting the post-fire responses of animal assemblages: testing a trait-based approach using spiders. J Anim Ecol 80:558–568PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  112. Langlands PR, Brennan KEC, Ward B (2012) Is the reassembly of an arid spider assemblage following fire deterministic? Austral Ecol 37:429–434CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  113. Latz P (1995) Bushfires and bushtucker. IAD Press, Alice SpringsGoogle Scholar
  114. Lea AM (1914a) Stomach contents of birds. Trans R Soc S Aust 38:439–440Google Scholar
  115. Lea AM (1914b) Insecta: Coleoptera. Trans R Soc S Aust 38:448–454Google Scholar
  116. Lea AM (1917a) Stomach contents of birds. Trans R Soc S Aust 41:466–468Google Scholar
  117. Lea AM (1917b) Insecta. Trans R Soc S Aust 41:489–630Google Scholar
  118. Leijs R, van Nes EH, Watts CH, Cooper SJB, Humphreys WF, Hogendoorn K (2012) Evolution of blind beetles in isolated aquifers: a test of alternative modes of speciation. PLoS One 7:e34260PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  119. Leys R, Watts CH (2008) Systematics and evolution of the Australian subterranean hydroporine diving beetles (Dytiscidae), with notes on Carabhydrus. Invertebr Syst 22:217–225CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  120. Leys R, Watts CHS, Cooper SJB, Humphreys WF (2003) Evolution of subterranean diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Hydroporini, Bidessini) in the arid zone of Australia. Evolution 57:2819–2834PubMedGoogle Scholar
  121. Lower O (1892) Lepidoptera. Trans R Soc S Aust 16:10–15Google Scholar
  122. Lower O (1896) Lepidoptera. In: Spencer B (ed) Report on the work of the Horn scientific expedition to Central Australia, part 2. Melville. Mullen and Slade, Melbourne, pp 249–253Google Scholar
  123. Main BY (1957) Biology of aganippine trapdoor spiders (Mygalomorphae: Ctenizidae). Aust J Zool 5:402–473CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  124. Majer JD (1990) Rehabilitation of disturbed land: long-term prospects for the recolonisation of fauna. Proc Ecol Soc Aust 16:509–517Google Scholar
  125. Majer JD (2009) Saga of the short-range endemic. Aust J Entomol 48:265–268CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  126. Majer JD, Beeston G (1996) Biodiversity integrity index: an illustration using ants in Western Australia. Conserv Biol 10:65–73CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  127. Majer JD, Orabi G, Bisevac L (2007) Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) pass the bioindicator scorecard. Myrmecol News 10:69–76Google Scholar
  128. Majer JD, Callan SK, Edwards K, Gunawardene NR, Taylor CK (2013) Baseline survey of the terrestrial invertebrate fauna of Barrow Island. Rec West Aust Mus Suppl 83:13–112CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  129. Matthews EH (1914) Mollusca. Trans R Soc S Aust 3:446Google Scholar
  130. Matthews EG (1976) Insect ecology. University of Queensland Press, St. LuciaGoogle Scholar
  131. Matthews EG (1980) A guide to the genera of beetles of South Australia. Part 1. South Australian Museum, AdelaideGoogle Scholar
  132. Matthews EG (1982) A guide to the genera of beetles of South Australia. Part 2. South Australian Museum, AdelaideGoogle Scholar
  133. Matthews EG (1984) A guide to the genera of beetles of South Australia. Part 3. South Australian Museum, AdelaideGoogle Scholar
  134. Matthews EG (1985) A guide to the genera of beetles of South Australia. Part 4. South Australian Museum, AdelaideGoogle Scholar
  135. Matthews EG (1987) A guide to the genera of beetles of South Australia. Part 5. South Australian Museum, AdelaideGoogle Scholar
  136. Matthews EG (1992) A guide to the genera of beetles of South Australia. Part 6. South Australian Museum, AdelaideGoogle Scholar
  137. Matthews EG (1997) A guide to the genera of beetles of South Australia part 7. South Australian Museum, AdelaideGoogle Scholar
  138. Matthews EG, Reid CAM (2002) A guide to the genera of beetles of South Australia part 8. South Australian Museum, AdelaideGoogle Scholar
  139. McGeoch MA (1998) The selection, testing and application of terrestrial insects as bioindicators. Biol Rev 73:181–201CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  140. McKenzie NL, Robinson AC (1987) A biological survey of the Nullarbor Region South and Western Australia in 1984. South Australian Department of Environment and Planning, Adelaide, Department of Conservation and Land management, Perth and Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service, CanberraGoogle Scholar
  141. McKeown KC (1936) Insect wonders of Australia. Angus and Robertson, SydneyGoogle Scholar
  142. McKeown KC (1945) Australian insects, 2nd rev. edn. Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, SydneyGoogle Scholar
  143. Morton SR (1982) Granivory in the Australian arid zone: diversity of harvester ants and structure of their communities. In: Barker WR, Greenslade PJM (eds) Evolution of the flora and fauna of arid Australia. Peacock Publications, Adelaide, pp 257–262Google Scholar
  144. Morton SR, James CD (1988) The diversity and abundance of lizards in arid Australia: a new hypothesis. Am Nat 132:237–256CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  145. Murphy NP, Guzik MT, Worthington Wilmer J (2010) Understanding the influence of landscape and dispersal on species distributions in fragmented groundwater dependent springs. Freshw Biol 55:2499–2509CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  146. Murphy NP, Guzik MT, Cooper JB, Austin A (2015a) Desert spring refugia: museums of diversity or evolutionary cradles? Zool Scr 44:693–701CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  147. Murphy NP, King RA, Delean S (2015b) Species, ESUs or populations? Delimiting and describing truly morphologically cryptic diversity in Australian desert springs. Invertebr Syst 29:457–467CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  148. Musgrave A (1945) The Simpson Desert expedition, 1939 – scientific reports. no. 4, biology: hemiptera. Trans R Soc S Aust 69:14–15Google Scholar
  149. Myers MJ, Resh V (1999) Spring-formed wetlands of the arid west: islands of aquatic invertebrate biodiversity. In: Batzer D, Rader RB, Wissinger SA (eds) Invertebrates in freshwater wetlands of North America: ecology and management. Wiley, New York, pp 811–828Google Scholar
  150. Naeem S, Thompson LJ, Lawler SP, Lawton JH, Woodfin RM (1995) Empirical evidence that declining species diversity may alter the performance of terrestrial ecosystems. Philos Trans R Soc London B Biol Sci 347:249–262CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  151. Page TJ, Humphreys WF, Hughes JM (2008) Shrimps down under: evolutionary relationships of subterranean crustaceans from Western Australia (Decapoda: Atyidae: Stygiocaris). PLoS One 3:e1618PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  152. Parr CL, Brockett BH (1999) Patch-mosaic burning: a new paradigm for savanna fire management in protected areas? Koedoe 42:117–130CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  153. Pinder AM, Halse S, Shiel RJ, McRae JM (2010) An arid zone awash with diversity: patterns in the distribution of aquatic invertebrates in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Rec West Aust Mus 78:205–246CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  154. Ponder W (2002) Desert springs of the Australian Great Artesian Basin. In: Sada DW, Sharpe SE (eds) Proceedings of the meeting on Spring-fed wetlands: important scientific and cultural resources of the intermountain region 7–9 May, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, pp 1–13. Available at: http://wetlands.dri.edu
  155. Poore GCB, Humphreys WF (1998) First record of Spelaeogriphacea from Australasia: a new genus and species from an aquifer in the arid Pilbara of Western Australia. Crustaceana 71:721–742CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  156. Pulleine RH (1914) Arachnida. Trans R Soc S Aust 38:447–448Google Scholar
  157. Rainbow WJ (1917) Araneidae. Trans R Soc S Aust 41:482–489Google Scholar
  158. Reid JRE, Kerle JA, Morton SR (1993) Uluru fauna. Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service, CanberraGoogle Scholar
  159. Rix MG, Edwards DL, Byrne M, Harvey MS, Joseph L, Roberts JD (2015) Biogeography and speciation of terrestrial fauna in the south-western Australian biodiversity hotspot. Biol Rev 90:762–793PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  160. Robertson P, Bennett AF, Lumsden LF, Silveira CE, Johnson PG, Yen AL, Milledge GA, Lillywhite PK, Pribble HJ (1989) Fauna of the Mallee study area, north- western Victoria. Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research, Technical report series no. 87. 91 ppGoogle Scholar
  161. Robinson A, Copley PB, Canty PD, Baker LM, Nesbitt BJ (eds) (2003) A biological survey of the Anangu Pitjantjatjara lands, South Australia, 1991–2001. Department for Environment and Heritage, AdelaideGoogle Scholar
  162. Sheldon F, Puckridge JT (1998) Macroinvertebrate assemblages of Goyder Lagoon, Diamantina River, South Australia. Trans R Soc S Aust 122:17–31Google Scholar
  163. Sheldon F, Boulton J, Puckridge JT (2002) Conservation value of variable connectivity: aquatic invertebrate assemblages of channel and floodplain habitats of a Central Australian arid-zone river, Cooper Creek. Biol Conserv 103:13–31CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  164. Shepard WD (1993) Desert springs-both rare and endangered. Aquat Conserv Mar Freshwat Ecosyst 3:351–359CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  165. Sloane TG (1893a) Broscides. Trans R Soc S Aust 16:203–213Google Scholar
  166. Sloane TG (1893b) Amycterini. Trans R Soc S Aust 16:213–236Google Scholar
  167. Sloane TG (1895) Notes on Carabidae from Lake Callabonna, Central Australia. Trans R Soc S Aust 19:124–137Google Scholar
  168. Sloane TG (1896) Carabidae. In: Spencer B (ed) Report on the work of the Horn scientific expedition to Central Australia, part 2. Melville, Mullen and Slade, Melbourne, pp 380–384Google Scholar
  169. Smith GT, Morton SR (1990) Responses by scorpions to fire-initiated succession in arid Australian spinifex grasslands. J Arachnol 18:241–244Google Scholar
  170. Smith GB, Eberhard SM, Perina G, Finston T (2012) New species of short range endemic troglobitic silverfish (Zygentoma: Nicoletiidae) from subterranean habitats in Western Australia’s semi-arid Pilbara region. Rec West Aust Mus 27:101–116CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  171. Southwood TRE (1977) Habitat, the templet for ecological strategies. J Anim Ecol 46:337–365CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  172. Spencer W (1896a) Report on the work of the Horn scientific expedition to Central Australia, parts I-IV. Melville, Mullen and Slade, London/MelbourneGoogle Scholar
  173. Spencer B (1896b) Acanthodrilus eremius, a new species of earthworm. In: Spencer B (ed) Report on the work of the Horn scientific expedition to Central Australia, part 2. Melville, Mullen and Slade, Melbourne, pp 416–420Google Scholar
  174. Stankowski S (2015) Layers of contingency shroud pervasive ecological divergence in a local radiation of land snails. Biol J Linn Soc 116:267–276CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  175. Sturt C (1849) Narrative of an expedition into Central Australia. T. and W. Boone, LondonGoogle Scholar
  176. Tate R (1894) Brief diagnoses of Mollusca from Central Australia. Trans R Soc S Aust 18:191–194Google Scholar
  177. Tate R (1896) Mollusca. In: Spencer B (ed) Report on the work of the Horn scientific expedition to central Australia, part 2. Melville, Mullen and Slade, Melbourne, pp 227–248Google Scholar
  178. Taylor RW (1983) Descriptive taxonomy: past, present, and future. In: Highley E, Taylor RW (eds) Australian systematic entomology: a bicentenary perspective. CSIRO Publishing, Canberra, pp 93–134Google Scholar
  179. Tepper JGO (1893) Orthoptera. Trans R Soc S Aust 16:151–153Google Scholar
  180. Tepper JGO (1895) Descriptions of little-known species of Blattariae, Gryllacridae, and Stenopelmatidae, collected at Lake Callabonna, SA. Trans R Soc S Aust 19:19–24Google Scholar
  181. Tepper JGO (1896) Orthoptera. In: Spencer B (ed) Report on the work of the Horn scientific expedition to central Australia, part 2. Melville, Mullen and Slade, Melbourne, pp 151–153Google Scholar
  182. Tietkins WH (1891) Journal of the central Australian exploring expedition, 1889. In: Bristow CE (ed), Government Printer, AdelaideGoogle Scholar
  183. Tillyard RJ (1926) The insects of Australia and New Zealand. Angus and Robertson, SydneyGoogle Scholar
  184. Timms BV (2001) Large freshwater lakes in arid Australia: a review of their limnology and threats to their future. Lakes Reserv Res Manag 6:183–196CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  185. Timms BV (2006) The large branchiopods of gnammas (rock holes) in Australia. J R Soc West Aust 89:163–173Google Scholar
  186. Timms BV (2007) The biology of the saline lakes of central and eastern inland of Australia: a review with special reference to their biogeographical affinities. Hydrobiologia 576:27–37CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  187. Tindale NB (1953) On some Australian Cossidae including the moth of the Witjuti (witchetty) Grub. Trans R Soc S Aust 76:56–65Google Scholar
  188. Tindale NB (1966) Insects as food for the Australian Aborigines. Aust Nat Hist 15:179–183Google Scholar
  189. Tindale NB (1981) Desert aborigines and the southern coastal peoples: some comparisons. In: Keast A (ed) Ecological biogeography of Australia. Dr. W. Junk bv Publishers, The Hague, pp 1853–1884CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  190. Turner AJ (1914) Insecta: Lepidoptera Heterocera. Trans R Soc S Aust 38:455–459Google Scholar
  191. Turpin M (2013) Semantic extension in Kaytetye flora and fauna terms. Aust J Linguist 33:488–518CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  192. Waite ER (1917) Results of the South Australian Museum expedition to Strzelecki and Cooper Creeks. September and October 1916. Trans R Soc S Aust 41:405–453Google Scholar
  193. Warburton PE (1875) Journey across the western interior of Australia. Sampson, Low, Marston, Low, and Searle, LondonGoogle Scholar
  194. Waterhouse GA (1914) Insecta: Lepidoptera Rhopalocera. Trans R Soc S Aust 38:455Google Scholar
  195. Watts CHS, Humphreys WF (2003) Twenty-five new Dytiscidae (Coleoptera) of the genera Tjirtudessus Watts and Humphreys, Nirripirti Watts and Humphreys and Bidessodes Regimbart, from underground waters in Australia. Rec S Aust Mus 36:135–187Google Scholar
  196. Watts CHS, Humphreys WF (2006) Twenty-six new Dytiscidae (Coleoptera) of the genera Limbodessus Guignot and Nirripirti Watts and Humphreys, from underground waters in Australia. Trans R Soc S Aust 130:123–185Google Scholar
  197. Watts CHS, Humphreys WF (2009) Fourteen new Dytiscidae (Coleoptera) of the genera Limbodessus Guignot, Paroster Sharp and Exocelina Broun, from underground waters in Australia. Trans R Soc S Aust 133:62–107Google Scholar
  198. Wells A (1993) Bugs and bug collectors of the northern territory: entomology and entomologists in the Northern Territory. State library of the Northern Territory occasional papers no. 40Google Scholar
  199. White SA (1910) A record of the A.O.U. expedition to Eyre’s Peninsula, October, 1909, with notes on ornithology, botany, and entomology. W. K. Thomas and Co., Printers, AdelaideCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  200. White SA (1914) Scientific notes on an expedition into the interior of Australia carried out by Capt. S.A. White, M.B.O.U., from July to October 1913. Trans Proc R Soc S Aust 38:407–474Google Scholar
  201. Williams WD (1980) Australian freshwater life: the invertebrates of Australian inland waters, 2nd edn. Macmillan, MelbourneGoogle Scholar
  202. Williams WD (1998) Biodiversity in salt lakes. In: McComb AJ, Davis JA (eds) Wetlands for the future. Contributions from INTECOL’s V international wetlands conference, Gleneagles Publishing, Adelaide, pp 161–166Google Scholar
  203. Wilson EO (1987) The little things that run the world (the importance and conservation of invertebrates). Conserv Biol 1:344–346CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  204. Withers PC, Edward DH (1998) Terrestrial fauna of granite outcrops in Western Australia. J R Soc West Aust 80:159–166Google Scholar
  205. Yen AL (1987) A preliminary assessment of the correlation between plant, vertebrate and Coleoptera communities in the Victorian mallee. In: Majer JD (ed) The role of invertebrates in conservation and biological survey. Western Australian Department of Conservation and Land Management Report, Perth, pp 73–88Google Scholar
  206. Yen AL (1989) Overstorey invertebrates in the Big Desert, Victoria. In: Noble JC, Bradstock RA (eds) Mediterranean landscapes in Australia: mallee ecosystems and their management. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, pp 285–299Google Scholar
  207. Yen AL (1996) The contribution of the Horn expedition to our knowledge of terrestrial invertebrates in central Australia. In: Morton SR, Mulvaney DJ (eds) Exploring central Australia: society, the environment and the 1894 Horn expedition. Surrey Beatty and Sons, Chipping Norton, pp 230–244Google Scholar
  208. Yen AL (2005) Insect and other invertebrate foods of Australian Aborigines. In: Paoletti MG (ed) Ecological implications of minilivestock. Science Publishers, Inc, Enfield, pp 367–387Google Scholar
  209. Yen AL (2011) Insects and other invertebrates. In: Joyce EB, McCann DA (eds) Burke and Wills: the scientific legacy of the Victorian exploring expedition. CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood, pp 193–206Google Scholar
  210. Yen AL (2014) The importance of recording local knowledge about edible insects in Oceania with particular reference to Australia. In: Durst P, Bayasgalanbat N (eds) Promotion of underutilized indigenous food resources for food security and nutrition ion Asia and the Pacific. UN FAO Office for Asia and the Pacific RAP Publication 2014/07, pp 78–91Google Scholar
  211. Yen AL, Wainer J (2003) Scolopendrid centipedes caught by pitfall trapping in the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, Northern Territory, including a record of an apparent ‘outbreak’. Proc Roy Soc Victoria 115:55–65Google Scholar
  212. Yen AL, Reid JRW, Wainer J (1996) A pitfall trap survey of ground dwelling invertebrates. In: Reidand JRW, Hobbs TJ (eds) Monitoring the vertebrate Fauna of Uluru National Park, Phase II – Final report. Consultancy Report to the Australian Nature Conservation Agency. CSIRO, Alice Springs, pp 139–159Google Scholar
  213. Yen AL, Gillen J, Gillespie R, Vanderwal R, the Mutitjulu Community (1997) A preliminary assessment of Anangu knowledge of Central Australian invertebrates. Mem Mus Victoria 56:631–634CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan D. Majer
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mark S. Harvey
    • 3
    • 4
  • W. F. Humphreys
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jenny A. Davis
    • 5
  • Alan L. Yen
    • 6
    • 7
  1. 1.School of Biological SciencesThe University of Western AustraliaCrawley (Perth)Australia
  2. 2.School of Molecular and Life SciencesCurtin UniversityBentleyAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Terrestrial ZoologyWestern Australian MuseumWelshpool DCAustralia
  4. 4.School of Biological SciencesThe University of Western AustraliaCrawleyAustralia
  5. 5.College of Engineering, IT and EnvironmentCharles Darwin UniversityDarwinAustralia
  6. 6.Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and ResourcesLa Trobe UniversityBundooraAustralia
  7. 7.School of Applied Systems BiologyAgriBio, La Trobe UniversityBundooraAustralia

Personalised recommendations