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Promising New Treatments for Chronic Pain

  • Robert W. Baloh
Chapter

Abstract

There is general agreement among researchers, clinicians and patients that we need better treatments for chronic neuropathic pain. With the rapid advances in our understanding of genetics and molecular biology in the last 25 years there is renewed enthusiasm that better treatments can be developed. Considering the complexity of pain transmission at the molecular level described earlier in this book, not surprisingly, there are a large number of potential targets for the development of new drugs. It is not the goal of this chapter to provide a complete list of potential new drugs for treating chronic pain but rather to provide examples of the process of new drug development and of several promising new drugs.

Keywords

Nerve growth factor (NGF) Sodium channel blockers Calcium channel blockers Endocannabinoid system (ECS) Opioid receptors Excitatory transmission Inhibitory transmission Dopamine Targeted drug delivery 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert W. Baloh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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