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Language Training in the Philippines: Measuring and Exploring Learner Experiences

  • Chihiro TajimaEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 785)

Abstract

Although the traditional English language training destinations, e.g., the U.S., the U.K., and Canada, are still popular among Japanese learners of English, non-English speaking countries such as the Philippines have also gained popularity as they are relatively inexpensive study abroad destinations. The present study attempts to clarify the outcomes and experiences of language training in the Philippines. The participants of this study were 21 Japanese learners studying English in the Philippines for five weeks. This was a longitudinal study and the data were collected over a period of two months. The study was conducted using a mixed methods approach to report findings from both quantitative and qualitative data. In particular, this study employed an explanatory sequential mixed methods design [1]. The present study is designed to investigate, within one study, the outcomes using quantitative data, then seek explanations by exploring the language learning experiences through the qualitative data.

Keywords

Study abroad Lingua franca Higher education students Sequential mixed methods design Second language acquisition 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Japan, Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research, Research (C), Grant number: 16K02984. Also, I am grateful to Paul Joyce at Kindai University, Japan, who provided time and expertise on the statistical analysis.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Gakushuin Women’s College, Faculty of Intercultural Communication, Associate Professor, 3-20-1 Toyama, Shinjyuku-KuTokyoJapan

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