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Introduction

  • Nicholas Wright
Chapter
Part of the New Perspectives in German Political Studies book series (NPG)

Abstract

This chapter sets out the main theoretical arguments in the book. It examines how key components of constructivism have inspired a new supranationalist theoretical analysis that CFSP has been responsible for a profound transformation not just in how member states make foreign policy, but in the interests and preferences that underpin this. This book does not dispute that member states have had to adapt to the requirements and pressures of CFSP. However, it argues that new supranationalist theorising pays insufficient attention to the national level. Thus, change remains rooted in national-level institutions and processes that give states the capacity to ‘play the game’ and are crucial in enabling them to act strategically in their engagement with the CFSP.

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicholas Wright
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceUniversity College LondonLondonUK

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