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Child Protection Systems in Australia

  • Kim Oates
Chapter
Part of the Child Maltreatment book series (MALT, volume 8)

Abstract

In Australia, the largest category of reported abuse is emotional (40%), followed by neglect (27%), physical abuse (19%) and sexual abuse (14%). Not long after “The Battered-Child Syndrome” was published in 1962, similar reports from Australia were published, in 1965, 1966 and 1968. Australia has mandatory reporting in all States, with the introduction of legislation spanning 40 years (1969–2009), so that legislation is not uniform. As well as mandated reporters, any citizen may make a report and if it is made in good faith the reporter is protected under the same legislation as mandated reporters. In 2009, Australia developed a National Action Plan, based on a public health approach, involving communities, children, young people, non-government organisations, business and the corporate sector. The key message is that protecting children is everyone’s responsibility. It is a long-term approach (2009–2020) with a process of regular, rolling 3 year Action Plans and annual reports to government. While Australia has made many advances in protecting its children, there is still a long way to go.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of SydneySydneyAustralia

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