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Sex, Desire, and Violence

  • Victoria Lynn Garrett
Chapter
Part of the New Directions in Latino American Cultures book series (NDLAC)

Abstract

This chapter examines diverse performances of gendered family roles in works that counter bourgeois social imaginaries by conceptualizing the family as an institution of abuse and exploitation. The first section analyzes representations of women who take unconventional actions attempting to free themselves from violent male family members in Armando Discépolo’s Entre el hierro, José González Castillo’s La serenata, and Florencio Sánchez’s Marta Gruni. The next section addresses how F. Defilippis Novoa’s Los desventurados, Alberto Novión’s Los primeros fríos, Armando and Enrique Santos Discépolo’s El organito, and José González Castillo’s and Alejandro E. Berruti’s El camino del infierno reveal that material hardships and capitalist fantasies generated fractured and monstrous masculinities. The last section returns to Discépolo’s El relojero to suggest that when new alternatives for men and women are explored, their problematic endings underscore the absence of easy solutions for such precarious subjects of Argentina’s peripheral modernity.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Victoria Lynn Garrett
    • 1
  1. 1.College of CharlestonCharlestonUSA

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