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Embodying Modernity

  • Victoria Lynn Garrett
Chapter
Part of the New Directions in Latino American Cultures book series (NDLAC)

Abstract

Armando Discépolo’s works mediated the impact of technological changes in Buenos Aires. His plays El viaje aquel, Mateo, Babilonia: Una hora entre criados, and El relojero make visible the social costs of progress: their protagonists are pre-modern subjects whose bodies and livelihoods cannot adapt to the changing cityscape. They inhabit a grotesque modernity that the plays resist through diverse performative tactics that neutralize symbols of order and progress. The protagonists resist a destructive, dysfunctional modernity by casting off their obsolete performances of daily life and adapting through transgressive acts, thus putting a grotesque face on the modern subject. They insist that despite liberalism’s enabling imaginaries, in such a corrupt society, only the criminal prosper, thereby signaling the need to reconsider the values that structure their everyday lives.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Victoria Lynn Garrett
    • 1
  1. 1.College of CharlestonCharlestonUSA

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