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It Doesn’t Add Up: Mental Illness in Paul Hornschemeier’s Mother, Come Home

  • Jessica Gross
Chapter
Part of the Literary Disability Studies book series (LIDIST)

Abstract

Gross argues that Hornschemeier’s comic presents, through its two main characters, David and Thomas Tennant, two different ways of dealing with trauma: trying to logically reason through it and sublimating trauma into fantasy. Neither approach helps the traumatized characters to heal from their trauma, but Gross argues that Mother, Come Home presents the act of writing this comic as the act that liberates its supposed author, Thomas Tennant, from his trauma. Gross also points to Mother, Come Home as an important work of graphic medicine for its depiction of trauma from a sufferer’s viewpoint and for its depiction of how the world looks to an individual experiencing trauma.

Works Cited

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  3. Czerwiec, M.K., et al. “Introduction.” Graphic Medicine Manifesto, edited by Susan Merrill Squier and Ian Williams, Pennsylvania State University Press, 2015, pp. 1–20.Google Scholar
  4. Haines, Steve, and Sophie Standing. Trauma Is Really Strange. Singing Dragon, 2016.Google Scholar
  5. Hornschemeier, Paul. Mother, Come Home. Fantagraphics Books, 2009.Google Scholar
  6. Rodrigue, Tanya K. “PostSecret as ImageText: The Reclamation of Traumatic Experiences and Identity.” The Future of Text and Image: Collected Essays on Literary and Visual Conjunctures, edited by Ofra Amihay and Lauren Walsh, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012, pp. 39–68.Google Scholar
  7. Romero-Jódar, Andrés. The Trauma Graphic Novel. Kindle Edition, Routledge, 2017.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jessica Gross
    • 1
  1. 1.St. Louis College of PharmacySt. LouisUSA

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