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A Note on Post-Lawrence Research on Social Dreaming

  • Julian Manley
Chapter
Part of the Studies in the Psychosocial book series (STIP)

Abstract

This chapter considers developments and ideas related to social dreaming that diverge from the Lawrencian model. These include the use of photos, drawing and a matrix of associations without dreams, the visual matrix. All these methods share significant features of social dreaming despite prioritising certain aspects over others depending on the object of the matrix. All share a wish to tackle complexity as typified by the term ‘hyperobject’, discussed as the massively complex object of all work of this kind.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julian Manley
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Central LancashirePrestonUK

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