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Definitive Care Phase of a Mass Casualty Incident

  • Offir Ben-IshayEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Hot Topics in Acute Care Surgery and Trauma book series (HTACST)

Abstract

Mass Casualty Incident (MCI) is an event that overwhelm the local healthcare system with a number of casualties that vastly exceed the local resources and capabilities in a short period of time. This definition puts an emphasis on the local resources of a particular hospital, as the affirmation of an ongoing MCI is different from one hospital to another, meaning that an MCI for one hospital is only a relatively busy day for another.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Surgical Oncology, Department of General SurgeryRambam Health Care CampusHaifaIsrael

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