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Rapid Assessment and Taxonomic Checklist of Vertebrates at the Foot of Gunung Tebu Forest Reserve, Terengganu

  • Nur Iema Omar
  • Muazzah Abd Latif
  • Nursamiyah Shamsul
  • Munirah Izzati Sharif Katullah
  • Hasrulzaman Hassan Basri
  • Amirul Asyraf Mazlan
  • Nur Farhana Azmi
  • Romanrio Ering
  • Salmi Abdullah
  • Habibah Anuar
  • Nurul Ahlam Ismail
  • Muhammad Hafiz Ahmad
  • Mohammad Naufal Mohammad Shah
  • Khairul Bariah Mohd Johan
  • Mohd Tajuddin Abdullah
Chapter

Abstract

The vertebrate diversity at the foot of Gunung Tebu Forest Reserve (GTFR) is not well documented therefore a study was conducted at lowland dipterocarp forest of Gunung Tebu Forest Reserve, Terengganu from 7th to 13th August 2016 and 27th August 2016 to 2nd September 2016 to record and construct a checklist of vertebrates from selected taxonomic group i.e.; mammals, aves and amphibians. A total of 470 individuals were observe and recorded consisting of 16 species of mammals (8 families and 4 orders), 64 species of aves (25 families and 10 orders) and 20 species of herpetofauna (6 families and a single order). The highest species abundance for bats recorded was Bicoloured Roundleaf Bat (Hipposideros bicolor) whereas for birds, the Greater Racket-tailed Drongo (Dicrurus paradiseus) shown highest species observed meanwhile for anurans, the highest species abundance documented was Spotted Litter Frog (Leptobrachium hendricksoni). An increase of sampling effort, number of transects and survey period could increase the number of species recorded in the area.

Keywords

Amphibians Aves Mammals Gunung Tebu 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to express our appreciation to staffs of Kenyir Research Institute and Universiti Malaysia Terengganu (UMT), Mr. Azuan Roslan, Mr. Muhamad Aidil Zahidin, Ms. Gertrude David, Ms. Elizabeth Pesiu, Ms. Amirah Azizah, Ms Nur Amalina Adanan and Ms. Nur Aisyah Rahim for assisting us throughout this sampling period. We would like to thank the staff of PSAR for various assistances throughout our stay at the resort. Financial support from Trans Disciplinary Research Grant Scheme (TRGS), No Vot: 59373 led by Professor Dr. Mohd Tajuddin Abdullah is acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nur Iema Omar
    • 1
    • 2
  • Muazzah Abd Latif
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nursamiyah Shamsul
    • 1
    • 2
  • Munirah Izzati Sharif Katullah
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hasrulzaman Hassan Basri
    • 2
  • Amirul Asyraf Mazlan
    • 3
  • Nur Farhana Azmi
    • 3
  • Romanrio Ering
    • 3
  • Salmi Abdullah
    • 3
  • Habibah Anuar
    • 3
  • Nurul Ahlam Ismail
    • 3
  • Muhammad Hafiz Ahmad
    • 3
  • Mohammad Naufal Mohammad Shah
    • 3
  • Khairul Bariah Mohd Johan
    • 3
  • Mohd Tajuddin Abdullah
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Zoology, Faculty of Resource Science and TechnologyUniversiti Malaysia SarawakKota SamarahanMalaysia
  2. 2.Centre for Kenyir Ecosystems Research, Institute of Tropical Biodiversity and Sustainable DevelopmentUniversiti Malaysia TerengganuKuala NerusMalaysia
  3. 3.School of Marine and Environmental SciencesUniversiti Malaysia TerengganuKuala NerusMalaysia

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