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Thyestean Savagery: Seneca, the Renaissance, and the Theatre of Cruelty

  • Amanda Di Ponio
Chapter
Part of the Avant-Gardes in Performance book series (AGP)

Abstract

Di Ponio considers the sources of dramatic cruelty with a focus on theatre and the double influence of Seneca, both on Antonin Artaud and on early modern dramatists, to whom Artaud is equally indebted. An Artaudian perspective helps to modify established perceptions of how to read the authority of Seneca in the Elizabethan context. In particular, Seneca’s Thyestes is considered as well as one of its doubles: Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus. The chapter closes with an analysis of Yukio Ninagawa’s 2004 production of Taitasu Andoronikasu.

Keywords

Antonin Artaud Seneca Thyestes Theatre of Cruelty Renaissance Titus Andronicus Sacrifice Yukio Ninagawa 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amanda Di Ponio
    • 1
  1. 1.Huron University CollegeLondonCanada

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