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International Legal Theory, International Community, and International Legal Order from a Dooyeweerdian Perspective

  • Romel Regalado BagaresEmail author
Chapter
Part of the New Approaches to the Scientific Study of Religion book series (NASR, volume 5)

Abstract

This chapter discusses how the radical social ontology inaugurated by the late Dutch, Christian, philosopher, Herman Dooyeweerd—hitherto largely unexplored for this purpose—may help illuminate contemporary debates on notions of an “international community” in relation to the international legal order.

In Dooyeweerd’s social ontology, extrapolated into a legal one, various associational spheres with their respective “sphere sovereignty” or differentiated responsibilities are themselves bearers of rights, thus inviting a renewed discussion on the philosophical foundations of international legal personality as well as of the sources of international law. Here, a state-centric international law is avoided, although states play an indispensable role in upholding public justice on the international plane. Moreover, the interrelations between these various spheres in what the philosopher calls the process of “enkapsis” is at the heart of what might be termed a Dooyeweerdian international legal theory. His theory of enkapsis promises to provide a better account of the problematique of the structure, composition and values of the so-called “international community.”

Keywords

Dooyeweerd International legal theory International community Sources of law Enkapsis United Nations International law Sovereignty States Sphere sovereignty Reformational philosophy Private international law Public international law International society 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for International LawManilaPhilippines

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