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Translating the French Resistance in London and New York

  • Angela Kershaw
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Languages at War book series (PASLW)

Abstract

After the fall of France in 1940, London and New York functioned as zones of hospitality for émigré French writers who established French-language journals and publications and used existing domestic publishing structures to maintain French culture in exile. The publication of French literature in wartime London and New York, in French and in English translation, illustrates the opportunities and the ambivalences of hospitality. Translational and editorial interventions in the versions of Joseph Kessel’s L’Armée des ombres published in full and as extracts in these cities show that ideological interventions take place as wartime texts circulate even amongst allies. Haakon Chevalier’s English translation of Kessel’s book shows that the politicisation of translation is as much about the choice of text as the choice of words.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angela Kershaw
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Modern LanguagesUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamUK

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