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Towards Diversified Ways to Promote Decent Working Trajectories: A Life and Career Design Proposal for Informal Workers

  • Marcelo Afonso RibeiroEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Lifelong Learning Book Series book series (LLLB, volume 23)

Abstract

How to ensure decent work in contexts predominantly marked by the informal economy? This poses a dilemma: should we seek the creation of decent work in the informal economy or the elimination of informality for decent job? We believe in the idea of creating decent working trajectories in the informal working. Thus, based on researches and practices systematically developed in recent decades in Brazil and Latin America, we present and discuss a career guidance and counseling proposal towards the promotion of decent work for informal workers, by a produced knowledge that articulates Northern epistemologies, inspired in the life design paradigm and grounded on a social constructionist perspective, with theories contextualized in the South.

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© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of São PauloSão PauloBrazil

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