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Adapting CBT-OB for Groups

  • Riccardo Dalle Grave
  • Massimiliano Sartirana
  • Marwan El Ghoch
  • Simona Calugi
Chapter

Abstract

Traditionally, weight-loss lifestyle-modification programmes based on behavioural therapy (BT-OB) have been predominantly administered to groups. Indeed, the group approach to obesity treatment does have several advantages over individual treatment, including lower treatment cost, social support, healthy competition, learning from others and developing a group mindset. However, the Look AHEAD study—a rigorous multicentre trial on preventing type 2 diabetes—examined a variety of group and individual approaches based on group BT-OB and concluded that individual contact is critical to retain participants in a multi-year intervention. Nevertheless, weight-loss lifestyle-modification programmes based on BT-OB remain poorly individualised and are still administered to groups over a prescribed order of sessions. As such they are unable to take into account the progress of each individual patient. To overcome this problem, we have adapted cognitive behavioural therapy for obesity (CBT-OB) for groups but retaining a highly personalised approach. In this way CBT-OB for groups maintains the advantages of group treatment while focusing on the individual. Group CBT-OB follows the protocol described in this book and includes the same number of sessions and stages as CBT-OB for individuals. However, to ensure that the needs of each participant are being met, the treatment is preceded by two individual sessions that will prepare them for group treatment.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Riccardo Dalle Grave
    • 1
  • Massimiliano Sartirana
    • 1
  • Marwan El Ghoch
    • 1
  • Simona Calugi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Eating and Weight DisordersVilla Garda HospitalGardaItaly

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