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Capacity of Perfusion- and Diffusion-Weighted MRI (PWI, DWI) and Perfusion CT (PCT) in Revealing of Acute Ischemia

  • Fridon Todua
  • Dudana Gachechiladze
Chapter

Abstract

For both vascular and nonvascular studies (e.g., mass lesions), relatively new and higher capacity methods of neurovisualization are used in clinical practice: diffusion-weighted (DWI) and perfusion-weighted MR imaging (PWI) and perfusion computed tomography (PCT).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fridon Todua
    • 1
  • Dudana Gachechiladze
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyNational Academy of Sciences of Georgia, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, I. Javakhishili Tbilisi State UniversityTbilisiGeorgia
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyProgramme of Caucasus UniversityTbilisiGeorgia
  3. 3.Department of Ultrasound DiagnosticsNational Medical Academy of Georgia, Research Institute of Clinical MedicineTbilisiGeorgia

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