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A Fibreless Multiwavelength NIRS System for Imaging Localised Changes in Cerebral Oxidised Cytochrome C Oxidase

  • D. Highton
  • D. Chitnis
  • S. Brigadoi
  • P. Phan
  • I. Tachtsidis
  • R. Cooper
  • N. Everdell
  • J. Hebden
  • M. Smith
  • C. E. Elwell
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1072)

Abstract

Measurement of the oxidation state of cytochrome c oxidase (oxCCO) can inform directly on neuronal metabolism. Conventionally this has been measured in vivo using benchtop broadband near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) systems. Spatially resolved measures of oxCCO have recently been made possible using a multichannel fibre-based broadband NIRS system. We describe the use of a fibreless multiwavelength NIRS system using light emitting diodes (LED) designed specifically to image localised changes in oxCCO and hence neuronal metabolism. A fibreless system consisting of four modules, each containing two LED sources and four photodiode detectors, was developed. Each LED source contained eight LED dies (780, 811, 818, 842, 850, 882, 891 and 901 nm) assembled in an area of 1.5 × 1.5 mm. A well-established hyperoxia protocol was used to evaluate the oxCCO spatially resolved measurement capabilities of the system and, subsequently, its imaging capabilities were tested using a functional activation paradigm. A multi-spectral image reconstruction approach was used to provide images of Δ[HbO2], Δ[HHb] and Δ[oxCCO] from the multi-distance, multi-channel optical datasets. This novel fibreless multiwavelength NIRS system allows imaging of localised changes in oxCCO in the human brain, and has potential for development as an inexpensive, wearable, continuous monitor of cerebral energetics in a range of experimental and clinical scenarios.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work has been funded by the EPSRC (EP/K020315/1). IT is supported by the Wellcome Trust (088429/Z/09/Z and 104580/Z/14/Z). RC is supported by EP/N025946/1. MS was part funded by the UCLH/UCL National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Highton
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. Chitnis
    • 3
  • S. Brigadoi
    • 3
    • 4
  • P. Phan
    • 3
  • I. Tachtsidis
    • 3
  • R. Cooper
    • 3
  • N. Everdell
    • 3
  • J. Hebden
    • 3
  • M. Smith
    • 1
    • 3
    • 5
  • C. E. Elwell
    • 3
  1. 1.Neurocritical Care UnitNational Hospital for Neurology and NeurosurgeryLondonUK
  2. 2.University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical EngineeringUCLLondonUK
  4. 4.Department of Developmental and Social PsychologyUniversity of PadovaPaduaItaly
  5. 5.NIHR University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research CentreLondonUK

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