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Exercise Testing and Prescription for Pregnant Women

  • Rita Santos-RochaEmail author
  • Isabel Corrales Gutiérrez
  • Anna Szumilewicz
  • Simona Pajaujiene
Chapter

Abstract

Physical exercise should be part of an active lifestyle during pregnancy and the puerperium, as shown by growing evidence on its benefits for the health of pregnant women and newborns. Appropriate exercise testing and exercise prescription are needed to tailor effective and safe exercise programs. Exercise testing and prescription in pregnancy is the plan of exercise and fitness-related activities designed to meet the health and fitness goals and motivations of the pregnant woman. It should address the health-related fitness components and the pregnancy-specific conditions, based on previous health and exercise assessments, and take into account the body adaptations and the pregnancy-related symptoms of each stage of pregnancy and postpartum, in order to provide safe and effective exercise. This chapter reviews the guidelines for exercise testing and prescription of pregnant and postpartum women to be developed by exercise professionals, following the health screening and medical clearance for exercise by healthcare providers.

Keywords

Pregnancy Postpartum Physical activity Exercise Exercise prescription Exercise testing Health screening 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rita Santos-Rocha
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Isabel Corrales Gutiérrez
    • 3
  • Anna Szumilewicz
    • 4
  • Simona Pajaujiene
    • 5
  1. 1.Sport Sciences School of Rio MaiorPolytechnic Institute of SantarémRio MaiorPortugal
  2. 2.Laboratory of Biomechanics and Functional Morphology, Interdisciplinary Centre for the Study of Human Performance, Faculty of Human KineticsUniversity of LisbonCruz Quebrada-DafundoPortugal
  3. 3.Fetal Medicine UnitUniversity Hospital Virgen MacarenaSevillaSpain
  4. 4.Faculty of Tourism and RecreationGdansk University of Physical Education and SportGdańskPoland
  5. 5.Lithuanian Sports UniversityKaunasLithuania

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