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Nonsurgical Management of Migraine

  • Nathaniel M. Schuster
Chapter

Abstract

A 26-year-old female biostatistics PhD student with history of motion sickness in childhood and no other significant past medical history presented for recurrent headaches. These headaches started during high school and were predominantly behind her left eye, throbbing, severe, and associated with light and sound sensitivity. Early in the course of a headache, she would experience nausea and would frequently vomit. Her headaches were worsened with routine activity and improved but did not completely remit with lying down in a dark room. They were not associated with visual disturbance.

Keywords

Migraine Chronic migraine Status migrainosus Menstrual migraine Abortive treatment of migraine Preventive treatment of migraine Medication-overuse headache 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Pain MedicineDepartment of Anesthesiology, University of California, San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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